calcium for alkaline soil

Hi All,
I am getting blossom rot on few of my peppers. My
research says that this is due to a lack of calcium
in my soil.
I have seen recommendations to grinding up a TUMS, but
my soil is already alkaline.
What would you guys use to add calcium to alkaline soil?
Calcium citrate from the vitamin store is too expensive.
Many thanks,
-T
Reply to
T
In article <rjnncs$99l$ snipped-for-privacy@dont-email.me, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.invalid says...
Just go to the garden section of Walmart, or any farm supply store. You can find calcium and other chemicals for blossom end rot for under $ 20 and some under $ 10 depending on how much and what brand.
Look on Google for calcium for tomatoes and get many web pages on it.
Reply to
Ralph Mowery
T wrote:
often it is called a lack of calcium, but what it may also indicate is uneven watering or the lack of a decent root system to support the plant and the development of fruits.
also when you have very alkaline soils you should be aiming to get the pH back towards neutral. adding calcium will not do that. adding gypsum will not change pH.
adding organic matter and improving the garden soil in a big enough area to support the plant and then making sure it gets enough water is helpful.
making sure there is a wind block, mulch to prevent water loss.
also perhaps there are peppers which will do better in your climate, so research selections for your area and soil type and see if there are any alternatives.
these are things i would work on.
songbird
songbird
Reply to
songbird
I water three times a week. I did missing one watering in the heat of August though. My two zukes got really pissed at me.
Now-a-days, the soil feels ever so slightly damp when I touch it before watering. And my sold changes color when it dries out.
But, I don't know what I am doing, so...
Reply to
T
You may have nailed it. Now that it is cooler, the problem has vanished
Reply to
T
transpiration through the leaves.
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however, this is BER we're talking about and the basic problem during really hot weather is keeping nutrients and water flowing towards the fruits evenly. if you have changes then that affects the quality of the fruits.
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(plant_disorder) peppers and tomatoes have the same sorts of reactions to uneven water and nutrient levels.
here when it gets hotter i increase the amount i'm watering to offset transpiration and evaporative losses. this year we had a really hot spell early in the season and normally that would result in some BER here, but because i watered more to offset i had no BER this year at all in the tomatoes. the few pepper plants i was growing i did not water as much at that time and most of the fruits on the bell peppers were stunted and poor quality with many showing signs of BER.
songbird
Reply to
songbird
Yes, evaporation. Plants are like straws. They suck moisture up from the soil and expire it out the undersides of their leaves. The hotter the environment, the more evaporation is needed by the plant.
Reply to
T

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