Zero clearance insert for Craftsman table saw

I've had a Craftsman job site table saw for a couple of years now and have been having a hard time trying to find a zero clearance insert for it. The inserts that come with it are metal rectangles that hook/latch into the table top. Here's a link to the saw: http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&pid921830000&catnch+Power+Tools&subcat=Table+Saws&vertical=TOOL&ihtoken=1
I know this is a long shot, but does anyone have ideas on where I can find a zero clearance TP for it? Thanks in advance.
Bob
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Bob Mill wrote:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&pid921830000&catnch+Power+Tools&subcat=Table+Saws&vertical=TOOL&ihtoken=1
I make my own out of plywood. A tip I haven't tried yet is using those white plastic kitchen cutting boards to make inserts.
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http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&pid921830000&catnch+Power+Tools&subcat=Table+Saws&vertical=TOOL&ihtoken=1
Use some doublesided tape to attach your old plate to piece of high quality plywood, use a templae bit in your router and you're in business.
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That's kinda was I was thinking, but here's a dumb question. Since they old insert clipped into the table, but plywood insert isn't going to be able to do that. How do you guys secure your homemade insert into the opening?
Thanks for all the help.
Bob
C & E wrote:

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Bob Mill wrote:

Mine just sits in there on the four 'feet' that protrude into the opening. You could wrap some tape around the perimieter of your existing a few times so that when you rout it will be slightly oversized. Then sand for a snug fit.
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RayV wrote:

If you're making a zero clearance insert, I'd look for a way to secure it to the table beyond a friction fit. I'd be afraid of the blade grabbing the thing and sending it flying.
Have you thought about drilling/tapping a few screw holes in the saw body below the insert?
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In the OP, the OP said he had one of those benchtop saws. The inserts in those are generally A) very thin (even thinner than my old Crapsman), and 2) don't have the traditional four 'feet' that the bigger boys do. A method for securing the insert may need to be a little more sophisticated than for larger saws.
To answer Bob Mill's question, those of us rolling our own on the big iron generally put a pin (clipped off nail) at the back of the insert which slides under the saw table (which is essentially what the OEM inserts have/do). That holds down the rear. Since all the force on the front of the insert is from the descending teeth on the front of the blade, the insert has no inclination to rise at the front.
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LRod

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Bob Mill wrote:
> That's kinda was I was thinking, but here's a dumb question. Since > they old insert clipped into the table, but plywood insert isn't going > to be able to do that. How do you guys secure your homemade insert > into the opening?
<snip>
I don't; however, after placing a blank plate in the opening, move the fence just over the edge of the insert to hold it down while the blade is lifted up to cut thru the blank insert.
After that, it is unnecessary to secure the plate.
Gravity does the job.
Lew
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A common problem with this group is that nobody seems to really read and understand many questions.
I too have this saw and I have also wondered how to make my own zero clearance inserts. The two challenges that I see are the "ears" that fit into the recesses at the one end plus the fact that the insert can only be about 1/4" thick due to that rod that pivots with the blade mount.
I haven't done it yet, but I was thinking of using 1/4" baltic birch plywood, using the existing insert as a template and routing as one person suggested. That might get an insert of the right shape and thickness to work. Then for the "ears" I was thinking of using little tabs of 1/4" baltic birch plywood and glue them and or screw them to the insert in the right locations and see if that works. Don't forget to drill the two holes at the front of the insert for the mounting/adjustment screws.

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Thanks for all the ideas.
Doug - I'm glad to hear that I'm not alone with this saw. I was thinking of doing the same thing you were suggesting. However, I was thinking that I could use picture hooks for the ears. You know those hooks you can hang on your wall with nail and they have all little hook for the picture wire? I was thinking on bending the hook straight and screwing it to the insert.

message
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I make mine with a small tab at the back that just slips under the saw table top when the insert is in place. The blade rotation makes it unlikely that the insert will raise at the front of the insert. At least, I've never had any trouble with that. I couldn't get to your link, does your saw use a sheet metal insert?
.
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Yes, the insert(s) that came with the saw are around 1/4" thick.
On Nov 17, 2:59 am, snipped-for-privacy@fellspt.charm.net () wrote:

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adhesive-backed rubber "dots". These are the ones used to cushion cabinet doors; or you stick them to the bottom of objects to protect table tops (must be rubber or soft plastic). Stuck to the edge of the insert they provide just enough friction to keep a fairly well-sized insert in place.
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Bob Mill wrote:

I put a nail or headless screw into the edge farthest from the operator, duplicating the tab on my factory inserts.
(4) hex screws let me level the insert in the opening.
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RE: Subject
Make your own using existing insert as a pattern for either a scroll saw or a router with a pattern bit.
I make mine using 3 layers of nominal 1/4" scrap hardboard held together with double back tape.
Gives me a finished thickness or about 5/8" which is just what I need.
Have lots of inserts that are basically job specific since they are so easy to make.
Lew
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