working with plexiglass

Page 2 of 3  

On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 04:45:52 -0700 (PDT), Andy Dingley

These days, edge polishing of plexiglas is done with a flame.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 19 July, 12:59, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

That tends to round the corners, so it's good for bare edges, but not if you're trying to make butt joints.
I make my display cases with 45 butted mitres. I can saw these on the bandsaw, but they still need polishing up to 400 grit wet & dry if they're to be invisible, even after solvent welding.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 04:45:52 -0700 (PDT), Andy Dingley

I bought acrylic doors for an entertainment centre that were cut to size on a tablesaw. By experimentation, I found that I could polish the edges by using a hand scraper to get rid of the blade marks and then a polishing wheel in a drill to finish them off. I was pleased to find out that it was a very fast process. Maybe not the established procedure, but it worked well for me.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 14:59:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

You're welcome Doug. After first trying the process of increasingly finer grits of sandpaper and then using the polishing compound, I realized that impatience would get to me long before any edges were polished. So, I looked for a shortcut.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's been a few years since I had to do that, but the last time I did I smoothed the edges as best I could with a file before digging out the sandpaper. Took a lot less time than it would have to do everything with sandpaper, but I'll surely give the scraper a try the next time I have to do this. I expect it to be quite a bit faster than files.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 7/19/10 11:19 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

It makes perfect sense that a scraper would work. Those hooked scoring tools they sell for plexi are essentially very narrow scrapers.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of course it does. It just never occurred to me. That's why I'm grateful to Upscale for mentioning it.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 19 Jul 2010 16:19:15 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

And definitely a lot smoother than files. A few seconds with the polishing wheel tells me if I need to go further with the scraper or just continue with the polishing wheel.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ed Lowenstein wrote:

Be aware that there are different types of Plexiglass. http://www.plexiglas.com/acrylicsheet/acrylicsheetfamily /
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I did the same project many years ago and offer the following tips in answer to your questions.
1 . There are 3 techniques used to bond acrylic plastics together depending on strength requirements, they are capillary, soak cementing or reactive. The capillary method can be accomplished using ethylene dichoride applied with a hyperdermic syringe. The reason for the syringe applicator is neatness counts. Spills away from the seem will show. Syringes are not easy to obtain as they have other nefarious uses.
2 and 3. No idea.
Try reaching the acrylic manufacturers such as Rohm and Hass, DuPont and many others. They usually can supply booklets or web sites with details of fabrication which should authoritatively answer all your questions.
Automotive tail light assemblies used (and maybe still are) to made of cast acrylic plastics.
Joe G
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

buy them all the time to glue small letters to a substrate.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recall a model maker neighbor used laquer thinner to bond plastics, but that's been fifty years or so ago.
I would suggest visiting a big hobby shop. I was in one recently and saw a rack filled with specialized adhesives and a counter manned by hobbyists!
As to the wooden base, might you rout a groove to take the plastic? Recessing the box into the base might serve to hide the joint and the glue used.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

GLASS syringe - the plastic ones weld themselves into a useless lump almost instantly! OTOH - a fine-tipped artist's brush works OK for small jobs.
2. If you can cut grooves for the acrylic to sit in, cyanoacrylate glue should work well. Paint some Pacer Technology "Zip Kicker" (hobby supplies again) onto the acrylic, let it dry for a few minutes, run the glue into the groove and assemble immediately - the glue will set rock-hard in about a second!
3. Depends entirely on size, construction, anticipated stresses, and whether or not you're right with Jesus. Talk to the supplier.
Nemo
----------------------------------------------------------- Posted using Android Newsgroup Downloader: .... http://www.sb-software.com/android -----------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

All you really need to bond Plexiglas is acetone. If straight acetone is too difficult to work with, mix some Plexiglas sawdust with it till you get the consistency you want.
nb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

That is not correct. Acetone does not dissolve plexiglass.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Really?
Can you cite some sites to back that up?
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Once a know-it-all troll, always a know-it-all troll!
and as usual, Full of Shit 61% of the time!
http://familywoodworking.org/forums/showthread.php?p 220
http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/chem00/chem00825.htm
http://www.thepenshop.net/Library%20Tutorials%20and%20Reference/Plexi.pdf
http://www.rplastics.com/faqs.html
http://www.overclockers.com/forums/showthread.php?t53848
http://www.ehow.com/how_5229770_glue-plexiglass-together.html
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/28985 /
http://www.ncwoodworker.net/forums/f55/plexiglass-finish-6957 /
http://www.wizdforums.co.uk/showthread.php?tf61
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You'll be lucky. Acetone dissolves acrylic well enough that a spill is damaging to the surface, but not well enough that it makes a useful solvent glue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 20 Jul 2010 08:58:59 -0700 (PDT), Andy Dingley

Greenhouse friends of mine from the 1970s use acetone exclusively for their orchid containers. All solvents which attack acrylic will damage the surface and most work really well for glue. Acetone is thin, quick drying, and has a very nice capillary action. <shrug>
-- Exercise ferments the humors, casts them into their proper channels, throws off redundancies, and helps nature in those secret distributions, without which the body cannot subsist in its vigor, nor the soul act with cheerfulness. -- Joseph Addison, The Spectator, July 12, 1711
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.