Workbench design help?

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As I find myself doing more work with hand tools, and working on larger projectt, I find I've outgrown my workbench, and it's time to make -- not buy -- one better suited to my needs.
I think I've pretty much decided to use a leg vise in the face-vise position, combined with a sliding deadman along the front face. This should give me adequate support, I think, for working long boards on their edges, and for cutting dovetails in drawer sides, and so on.
But I'm still wondering what to use as an end vise. I see *lots* of benches with an L-shaped tail vise at the end. And I must confess I'm mystified. What benefit do you get from a tail vise that you can't get from some other, simpler, less-expensive configurarion?
In particular, I have a Wilton vise similar to this one
http://i1011.photobucket.com/albums/af239/whtsup/4264582093.jpg that I bought at an auction a while back for ten bucks or so, and I'm thinking about mounting a wooden face about 16" wide on it, and using that for my end vise.
Questions: What (if anything) is wrong with that plan? What might I be overlooking? What advantages (if any) might a tail vise have over that?
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On Sat, 6 Apr 2013 18:38:42 +0000 (UTC), Doug Miller

No reason why you can't use the Wilton. You already have it and there's no addition funds (or very little) needed to use it. The main consideration is will you be satisfied with it?
I grew up using the two metal vises on my father's work bench. And that's what I'm comfortable using now. I think many people see the occasional professional using mostly wooden vises and think that's what they should have. It's just preference and nothing else.
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On 4/6/2013 1:38 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

The tail vice is going to have an advantage when hand planing narrow stock, like a table leg. The bench would support all of the stock and not let it bow or bend from the pressure of the plane.
That said, this is a great place to visit and get ideas and premium parts for your bench should you decide to go with top end stuff.
http://benchcrafted.com/TailVise.html
The videos are worth a look too if you have not been here.
http://benchcrafted.com/TailVise.html
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I'd get the same benefit from a planing stop at the other end of the bench, though, wouldn't I? Still not seeing the need for the tail vise. And still thinking I must be missing something, because it's so common I figure there must be a reason...

What they call a tail vise there is actually a wagon vise...

Interesting vids, though. Thanks for the link. That leg vise looks like just the ticket for the face.
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On 4/6/2013 4:32 PM, Doug Miller wrote:

Why a 16" face? Not sure how wide your vise is, but I think a 16" face might be a little much for a tail vise. Why? Because a tail vise you will put the dog in near the edge of your bench. So assuming you're not using the dog on the vice you will need to mount it off center, and with a 16" block that give you a lot of leverage to twist your vise and ruin it.
You can get by with a slight off center dog (I have one in my block mounted to my metal vise similar to yours) but it is maybe 1 " off center from the vise so I could get it closer to the edge.
If I mis understood the question sorry.
--
Jeff

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Increase its clamping capacity.

Right.

Planning to use spacers as needed to keep the vise from twisting. I have to do that now anyway because my current bench has a cheap vise that twists if you look at it funny, so I'm used to it.

I think you did, but I appreciate your comments anyway. Your points are certainly valid, but I think I've already taken those concerns into account as I described -- if you disagree, I'd certainly like to hear your reasons.
The main thing I'm wondering is what's the purpose of L-shaped tail vises like this one?
http://www.workbenchdesign.net/images/klbench1.jpg
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Doug Miller wrote:

I think it allows easier access to "both sides" of the fore-mentioned table leg. It's also a thing of beauty, no? : ) It reminds me of the craftsmen who desired to exhibit their expertise via their tool chests. Surely such detail is not superfuous if it helps put food on the table, or for a number of other good reasons!
Bill
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On 4/7/2013 10:49 AM, Bill wrote:

NO it doesn't allow access to both sides of the table leg!
--
Jeff

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woodchucker wrote:

It will give you more access to the other side than your front vise.
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On 4/7/2013 9:24 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Ohhhh, that is a good question... Looking at it, the wood is totally different from the rest of the bench so perhaps it was moved from another bench to this one and this is how it came out to fit.
I don't recall having ever seen this "L" shape at all in the past, have you seen others examples?
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There are examples everywhere, this is just one of many http://www.woodcraft.com/product/2081005/30367/pinnacle-large-traditional- cabinetmakers-workbench.aspx For that matter, what's the purpose of this type of vise? http://www.inkbox.net/wood/bench/tailvise.html
I just don't see the benefit.
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On 4/7/2013 11:21 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

Yup

I just had a brilliant idea, email Solberg, obviously I am guessing on the spelling, and ask them what the purpose is.
I certainly see the purpose for this location but like you the "L" portion is the puzzle unless it is to simply to be something that the mechanical portion of the vice attaches to. Possibly guide rods to insure that it travels in a straight line. A top view would be nice.
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On 4/7/2013 12:04 PM, Leon wrote:

Ok, think about actually building the vise. You can't really depend on the screw to support the vice so that has to be at least one guide rod. Because the main long section has through dog holes the screw and or the guide rod can't go through that section either. So the screw has to be off set. I am guessing that the screw is to the right of the main section of the vice and there is a guide rod in the "L" section to keep everything from torquing when pressure is applied.
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On 4/7/2013 1:04 PM, Leon wrote:

Yes that is also part of it. When made of wood the l provides supporting guide rails on the L.
When you look at it from underneath or flipped over. It is the part that prevents racking. And separation of the L piece from the Jaw since the JAW continues under the bench.
--
Jeff

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On Sun, 07 Apr 2013 12:04:50 -0500, Leon wrote:

traditional-

I have a SJÖBERGS catalog and they show only one bench with an L vise, it is holding a round object with concave jaws in the vise.
basilisk
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On Sunday, April 7, 2013 10:46:21 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

ferent from the rest of the bench so perhaps it was moved from another benc h to this one and this is how it came out to fit. I don't recall having eve r seen this "L" shape at all in the past, have you seen others examples?
Or the user needed a specific vise design, for some repeatable process, mor e so for his specific needs, and this is what works for him.
As Bill noted, it has an additional asthetic appeal, lending itself to poss ibly profiting from the design. The aesthetic appeal kind of reminds me of the oak loveseat rocker I made, with the slanted arms. The arms may look impressive, but their function is limited and lacking, at times.
Sonny
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On 4/7/2013 10:24 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

That's because it is a wood tail vise for square dogs. The traditional wood screw or metal in this case is off to the side where it can properly work for this design. it would not work if it were lined up with the dogs. This keeps the dogs to the edge, but allows the screw to have some beefy wood to support it's action. Remeber this does double duty as a vise for dogs and a vise for clamping perpendicular. The wood needed on the end if it were not L would be very large, and limiting.
--
Jeff

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On 04/07/2013 07:24 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

This has some ideas: http://carlswoodworking.wordpress.com/2010/10/15/tail-vise-options/
and this: http://workbenchdesign.net/
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Ideas, yes, but not explanations. I'm still trying to figure out what advantage(s), if any, an end vise like this
http://carlswoodworking.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/tail03.jpg?w00&h#5
or this
http://www.inkbox.net/wood/bench/tailvise.jpg
might have over one like this
http://carlswoodworking.files.wordpress.com/2010/10/tail09.jpg?wS0
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On 04/07/2013 11:47 AM, Doug Miller wrote:

The one comment on the L vise was that it tended to sag.
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