wood screws?

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Yep, they are wood screws..Like someone posted earlier, the black drywall screws are 10 times stronger than these wood screws.
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HomeBrewer

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And Dry wall screws are about half way between the screws you are complaining about and the McFeeleys square drive screws.
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I read another article - again not sure if Wood or Popular Mechanics, or some other mag., about drywall screws vs. wood screws. If you use drywall screws, you should make sure that they are the ones with the tighter thread pattern and that are not smooth just under the head. The problem is that on those (with the wider pattern and smooth under the head), I read, is that they do not pull the two pieces of wood together evenly, and don't hold evenly (depending on the thickness of the wood). This can cause a loose or weak connection.
The illustration that went with the article made it obivious - but I don't think I have the ability to describe it in words. Ever since then, when I use drywall screws in wood, I make sure it use the tighter thread pattern. FWIW -
Nick B

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Home Brewer writes:

Go with Jim Ray at www.mcfeelys.com
If those were brass screws, though, you're going to continue to have twist offs unless you go up a hair on thepilot hole size and wax the threads before driving the screws.
Stainless steel will help, but you're not getting 10 of them for 88 cents.
Charlie Self "Why isn't there a special name for the tops of your feet?" Lily Tomlin
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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: I just bought 2 packages of #8 x 2" wood screws at Lowes. 5 in each pack and : it cost $.88. I predrilled and counter sunk the holes in an oak step stool : I'm making and 5 out of the 10 screws twisted apart. Are these things that : bad? If so what brand of wood screws should I get and where? That is totally : unacceptable in my book. It's not like I can't afford the change, but it : just really pissed me off tonight.
: -- : HomeBrewer
Your problem is not thescrews. If you seleted the right pilot hole bit it's not the pilot hole bit.
Your problem is that when drivign screws into oak or other hardwoods you have to lubricate them first. Some use beeswax (the real thing). I like to use linseed oil as that helps keep the wood fresh.
Use what you like, but you must lubricate the screw.
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
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My company, McFeely's, sells screws, so the following is biased!
Many of the hardware store screws are problematic because they are not hardened. Even drywall screws are hardened, and they only need to go through compressed gypsum and a softwood stud or thin steel stud. The result is a screw that breaks very easily. The solution is to lubricate the screw with beeswax or one of the commercially available fastener lubricants such as Akempucky, then drill slightly oversized pilot and body holes. Many of the hardware store screws have shank diameters equal to the outside diameter of the screw threads which is why it is important to drill a clearance hole in the first board. Consult one of the many pilot hole charts available for a recommendation on body and pilot hole sizes, (ours is at http://www.mcfeelys.com/wadb.asp ) or do what craftsman have done successfully for years - hold a drill bit up to the threads and pick a size that just shades the root diameter (for hardwoods) or almost shades the root diameter (for softwoods).
Remember too that solid brass, silicon bronze, and even stainless steel are inherently softer than a good hardened steel screw, and thus require more care during installation. Prethreading the hole with a steel screw can be effective way to prevent breakage, or you may simply increase the screw size to the next larger wire diameter.
If you need additional information, feel free to give my technical director, Darin Lawrence, a call at 1-800-443-7937.
Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws www.mcfeelys.com

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Jim Ray wrote:

Justifiably so. If you've never had a McFeely's catalog, you should get one even if just for reference. These guys have tucked a lot of generally useful information (tables, diagrams, and prose) into their slim (less than 100 page) catalog. If you use square drive, or are thinking about it, you owe it to yourself to at least read this one.
Mr. Ray is also the cover model for all their catalogs - you've been warned! (-:
--
Morris Dovey
West Des Moines, Iowa USA
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Oops, my "cover" is blown!
Thanks for your kind words,
Jim Ray, President McFeely's Square Drive Screws www.mcfeelys.com

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| | ...hold a drill bit up to the threads...
Dang, I thought I invented that technique. :-) Of course I discovered it out of foolish necessity -- instead of having a neatly organized rack of drill bits clearly labelled according to diameter, I had a bin of randomly sized bits rattling around together. Finding a bit to drill a pilot hole was a matter of holding the screw up to the light with a bit in front of it to see if I could still see threads behind the bit.
Years later, as an engineer, I made the mistake of drilling a 0.2500 hole in aluminum for a 0.2500 steel dowel pin. The test fit worked great -- once. 0.2504 is a good diameter for a 0.2500 dowel pin. Nothing like empirical engineering to keep you out of trouble.
--Jay
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Reminds me of of the time I got four boxes of finish nails at menards. I don't know what these things were made of but my guess was soft lead; at least that is what it felt like. I could not get one of these nails in if my life depended on it; didn't matter if it was fur, pine, balsa! I did go back and tell the manager and he said, "well you need the hard wood nails" which were great by the way. I asked him why he stocks 90% crap nails and 10% good nails...blank stair. I challenged him to pound one in a pallet that was right there. Between them, the store manager, hardware assistant, and a couple workers, they got 2 in about 25 tries.
What a joke.
HomeBrewer wrote:

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I've, now this is not shit, got some finishing nails that I believe to be annealed aluminum. They're nearly as big around as an 8 but less than an inch long and painted a tan color. I'm not really sure where they came from but they have an amazing low holding power and will bend when driven in to soft pine if not done carefully. I've kept them because they have some small utility for hanging light items.

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Visit the McNealy's site and get their catalog. They are, unless I am out and in desperate need, the only screws I use. Haven't had one fail on me yet.
--
Mike G.
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Ooop's; that's Mcfeely's. Sorry about that
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Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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Aw Mike, I bet McNeeleys is the wholesale name of McFeeleys.. ;~)

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Naw. it's an Asian knock off shop.
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Mike G.
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Is that where you have been getting your dry wall screws at? LOL

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my spell checker always changes McFeely to McNealy don't know why.
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"Leon" < snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net> wrote in message
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Cause you have not added McFeeleys to your list of words yet.... Nor have I ..but going to right now.
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Can't go wrong with the screws avail from McFleely's.
RT

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totally
Run, don't walk - to McFeely's web site. Buy their screws and a couple of square drive bits. You will never worry about it again.
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