Wood Plug Trim Saw

I thought this weeks tip from WoodworkingTips.com , (woodsmith) was a pretty good Idea, So I thought I'd pass it along.
http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip031219sn.html
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 05:32:50 -0500, "anthony diodati"

I looked at that--don't need it. I bought an inexpensive Japanese flush-cut saw from Harbour Freight that makes cutting off plugs a snap. After I bought it, I wondered why I didn't buy one long ago.
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I have one from Lee Valley that has proven itself to be invaluable. Each Adirondack chair I make has more than 30 plugs.
Dick Durbin
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I bought one of those as well,a piece of tape pevents any scratches from the Stanley pull saw
wrote:

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Great tip...thanks for taking the time to share it with us. Happy woodworking thanks, Mike from American Sycamore
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Rhe pull saw is great for trimming plugs an dowels. Used alone, you will most likely scratch adjacent surfaces. I made a very servicable "guard" out of "hobby" sheet brass (0.10") I found at my local Ace Hardware. Sandwich the brass between wood scraps, drill appropriate-sized holes for the plugs, drop over the plug and saw away. I keep mine in a CD case to keep it flat when taking to jobsite. The brass sheet won't harm the pill saw teeth. Try it, works for me.
Roger OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO snipped-for-privacy@ccrtc.com (Mike at American Sycamore) wrote in message

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: I thought this weeks tip from WoodworkingTips.com , (woodsmith) was a : pretty good Idea, So I thought I'd pass it along.
: http://www.woodworkingtips.com/etips/etip031219sn.html
Thanks for posting the tip.
I, myself, prefer to use a chisel. Making sure it slices and doesn't break the plug. On a boat that's 28 feet longI have hundreds of these to do and it's pretty simple to get it down to a minimal sand/plane level with a chisel.
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
"Improvise, adapt, overcome." snipped-for-privacy@head-cfa.harvard.edu Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Phone: (617) 496-1558
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Yep, I tend to start off by taping around the plug with some of the blue "painter's tape", and then I take a flushcut saw and get it close. After that, it's just a few slicing motions approaching the plug from the outside towards the middle and you're good to go.
The tape prevents scratches; if you're paying attention, you catch yourself as soon as you nick the tape rather than contacting the wood. Also, a crank-neck chisel is nice to have. You can keep the chisel from diving even when you're working in the middle of a wide piece. There the handle on a standard chisel tends to interfere with keeping the back flush to the work.
Chuck Vance
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Coast of the US., that I have 'slicked off' Have a 2 inch socket firmer chisel, a Greenlee. that is just for that purpose. Slight radius to cutting edge and first cuts are taken with 'BEVEL DOWN' not 'UP' as is usual practice. This prevents grain tearout or the cut following a downward tending grain pattern in the plug. I was taught a slight oblique angle of attack if at all possible with a bit of a slicing motion. Usually takes but 3 'slicks' to remove plug flush to surface of deck or plank. I do believe that a wide blade does better at this than a narrower one. Tales of a Boatbuilder Apprentice http://pages.sbcglobal.net/djf3rd /
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