Wiring and plug for a 3 hp cabinet saw

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Thanks everyone. I plan to use 12ga wire, 20amp 2-pole breaker, and matching plug/receptacle.
Best, David
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12-2, right? Not 12-3?
Excuse me if I'm telling you things you already know, but there is occasional confusion on this part. For premises wiring such as NM cable (Romex), the number after the dash indicates the number of current-carrying conductors, and does *not* include the ground. Thus, 12-2 Romex has three wires in it, and 12-3 has four.
xx-3 cable is used for electric dryers, cooktops, ovens, etc. because those appliances also have 120V circuits (timers, motors, etc.) which need a neutral.
Pure 240V loads, such as a table saw or electric baseboard heater, use only the two hot conductors and thus need only xx-2 cable. With ground, of course.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug, Your previous comment is right on target--I was subject to the confusion you referenced. You saved me the extra expense of the 3 conductor wire. I'm getting 12/2. Thanks.
wrote:

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On Mon, 15 Oct 2007 17:36:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

In addition to that labeling confusing a lot of people, back in about 1960 when I worked in a hardware store, if you wanted a ground with your NMC you had to state "with ground." If you asked for 12-2, you got a two conductor wire, no ground. If you wanted a ground wire, you had to ask for 12-2 w/ground. That's no longer the case--now you get a ground with your NMC whether you want it or not (and why wouldn't you?).
In those days, two wires went to your electric water heater or your pool pump--both hot. I know--I grew up in a house in FL which we built in 1956. We had a pool installed in 1960 (which, watching the electrician, who was the dad of a classmate, was the beginning of my education on electricity). There was no ground required.
Obviously, that, too, is no longer the case.
--
LRod

Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
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This question is OT to the original post:
Based on the OP's motor's description, what information on the tag for the Baldor motor is missing that would make one suspect the motor is really a 3 ph, 3hp motor?
For example, I find a 3hp motor at a flea market, and the seller claimed it was from a table saw, what clue would I look for to tell me it is 3 phase? (and thus should put it down, since I ain't going to get 3 phase in my house, no way, no how.)
Wouldn't a 3 phase also be listed as input voltage 203 to 230 VAC phase-to-phase?
Phil

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Something else to consider when buying from a flea market, you need to be sure of the spin direction. Left and right tilt saw motors spin in opposite directions.
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The nameplate will say 3 PH
Voltage can vary from 208 to 480. Typical single phase won't go over 230.
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wrote:

Unless you're in Canada, and perhaps other countries where 3ph is 600v. I just had a lesson on this recently.
Jeffo
long time lurker, occasional poster
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Phil-In-Mich. wrote: ...

Well, if it has the manufacturer's tag on it, number of phase will be marked. And if it doesn't have the tag, I'm not buying any motor for anything other than junk, basically, unless there's a way to test the operation at what is being claimed is the operating voltage/phase...
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It's a single phase. (Indicated on the info plate along with the other stuff.)

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