Who is your favourite woodworking guru?

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Tony Burch wrote:

on line forums. Leon, for one, has helped me on a number of occasions, so he gets special mention. Others on line over the past few years have also earned my heartfelt appreciation. the TV guys? I can take 'em or leave 'em.
Dave
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Tony Burch wrote:

Ian Kirby knows what's up. I like his stuff because he focuses on efficiency of body and work process.
JP
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Rob Cosman: not only a great guy and an excellent teacher, but a professional with standards I can aspire to.
Tony Burch wrote:

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In no particular order
James Krenov - do a few things exceptionally well, let the wood do the talking and K.I.S.S. (Keep It Simple Stupid) - or at least make it appear so, use the wood wisely
Sam Maloof - make things that function well and are visually as well as tactily pleasing- a chair or bench that beckons you to sit and run your hand over it
Toshio Odate - japanese tools, their use and approach to their use
Michael Fortune - don't be limited to flat surfaces and straight lines Great teacher, great woodworker, nice person
Frank Klausz - pragmatic and efficient with a bias towards traditional methods and joinery
Ian Kirby - one of the few who passes on the fundamentals with the why as well as the how. open to using the latest materials, appreciating the freedom they bring.
Michael Colca - Central Texas very high furniture maker. He and wife built an amazing home, shop on the first floor full of old heavy iron and wondrous wood, living space above of beatiful woods and craftsmanship everywhere you look. (www.colca.com)
Tage Frid - cause an upside down belt sander for sharpening chisels is just fine
Can kick myself for drawing a blank on the name - google "Soul of a Tree" - wondrous wood with minimal human modification to make it useful
Norm - for getting people to try woodworking
Roy - for perpetuating the use of hand tools and getting people to try woodworking
should do for a start
charlie b
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: Can kick myself for drawing a blank on the name - : google "Soul of : a Tree" - wondrous wood with minimal human : modification to make : it useful
George Nakashima. Amazing work -- has to be seen in person to really appreciate it.
I'd also toss in John Reed Fox and Andrew Craford. And David Marks.
    -- Andy Barss
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Nakashima! Saw - and drew - most of the extant great trees. (Now I won't awaken in the middle of the night yelling "Nakashima idiot!")
charlie b
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I believe Tom Plamann deserves at least a mention, dontcha y'all think?
http://www.plamann.com
Renata
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Amy Devers

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