White Oak price

Can someone tell me approximate price of 3" wide 8/4 thick white oak in NYC metro area? Also can someone explain to me which stock is sold by LF and which by BF? Does the length of the board in general affect LF or BF price?
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http://www.woodfinder.com/search.php?search=white%20oak
...then, the business sites give you their own details.
--
Alex
cravdraa - at - yahoo - dot - comment
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A hardwood dealer is probably selling random with boards by the board foot. Home centers sell specific sized and trimmed lumber and use the lineal foot method because most of the shoppers and almost all of the employees have no idea what a board foot is, let alone be able to calculate how much is in a 6" wide board.
As for the price of your wood, in the NYC metro area it is probably 50% to 100% higher than it should be. Right now I can buy 8/4 for 4.85 a bd. ft. Quarter sawn 7.50 There will be some waste in that though as it is priced rough cut, random width.
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Well, this is a White Plains price, a bit north of the metro area, but Condon Lumber sells 4/4 for 3.25/bf and 8/4 for 4.95/bf.
-Keith
wrote:

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On Tue, 18 Jan 2005 20:11:09 -0700, Keith wrote

(listed as Indiana WO). Last month it was $4.30 for s2s (4/4) so the price has jumped!
-Bruce

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The Wood Rack in Branford, CT (just take the Port Jeff Ferry) had White Oak for about $3.50 a bd. ft last time I checked..

BORG out of desparation. All of the lumber yards deal in bd ft. The exception are those that carry thin stock (1/4", 1/2"). These thicknesses are typically sold in sq. ft.
Kevin Daly http://hometown.aol.com/kdaly10475/page1.html
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Kevin Daly wrote:

Am I the only one who thinks this place's prices are a little confusing?
www.bythebays.com/suburban/dried-price.htm
At the bottom it says all prices are "per linear board foot". Doesn't it have to be one or the other?
FoggyTown
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If you want to drive a few hundred miles to northern Indiana my supplier sells red and white rough cut oak, varying widths (from 4 inches to about 12 inches), 10 to 14 foot lenths, 4/4 for $2.40 a board foot and 8/4 for $2.86 a board foot. From what i have seen on here that seems to be cheap.
Silersbrew, been lurking for a while and ready to contribute.

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Who is the supplier? I am in Eastern Illinois and will need some birch in the coming months.
Len ----------------
Silersbrew wrote:

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Supprisingly enough it is a local lumber yard, They are Amish owned and operated. Located north of Fort Wayne IN. Would have to check to see about Birch. They get there rough cut in and work the wood into boards and trim in their mill room. Then sell the product at high prices to make their profit. They sell the rough cut material at basically their cost.
Although I have wondered if I should keep this source a secret lol.
Silersbrew

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Leonard Lopez wrote:

You might want to look at Hartzell Lumber http://www.hartzellwoodstock.bigstep.com/ . White birch (select) is under $2 a foot with #1 and #2 even less. Quality is excellent. Even with shipping you may well come out ahead.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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Advantage Lumber, Rob Pelc place, shipped wood from N.Y. to southern Calif and the price including S&H was half what the local hardwood store charges. Now he has minimum amount that excludes small buys.

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Silersbrew wrote:

Graded, tree-run, kiln- or air-dried, ???
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I need it to build the doors and drawers for my new kitchen cabinets. Grading is FS I think? Kiln dried. I don't know the term "tree run". Please explain.
Len Lopez
Duane Bozarth wrote:

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Leonard Lopez wrote:

Ungraded, as it comes off the mill (tree)...
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Not sure on the grading as I am not real familiar with the grading process. I know it is Kiln dried. Have been using it for about 8 years with very little problems. Have never had any problem with it twisting, warping or bowing.
Now what exactly do you mean by "tree-run" been woodworking for years, but not up to date with all terminology
Silersbrew

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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

I believe that they meant "log-run" not tree-run :-) Log Run is all lumber sawn from the log. All grades inclusive. Every log will have some lower grade lumber, even the best of them. It is usually cheaper if you take all of the sawn lumber from any one log, rather than just buying the best of the lot.
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Curly Woods wrote: ...

No, I meant "tree", not "log". The log came from the tree... :)
Guess that's a local idiom depending on who/where one is...around the small sawmills in VA and TN I was near, "tree run" was their term and I picked it up from them. (Being a W KS wheat farmer as a kid, it was all new to me, so whatever I heard there was what I heard first, so as usual that's what I've retained.)
In those mills (and this was quite some time ago before lumber prices were nearly so high --I recall one really nice batch of red oak was $0.10/bd-ft! -- and the premium for graded lumber not so significant) they simply stacked everything w/ the exception of culling really poor slabs and ran it through the kiln, then stacked it. For local sale it was then stacked either bundled or not, the unbundled obviously for the typical individual purchaser. You could, on occasion still find boards from the same tree together, but by the time it had been handled so much it was mixed up enough that wasn't always easy w/o a lot of sorting and stacking/restacking.
It was another story for the truly exceptional walnut log say, where it was cut and kept together in its entirety -- but that was the rare exception, not the rule.
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Duane Bozarth wrote:

I guess, if there is a difference these two scenarios <might> be it...in one case, it is "log run" because the boards/slabs all did come from the same log (and would usually even be kept stacked in order).
In the other case, it's whatever they cut in a particular mill run and no real attempt to maintain the individual boards together through the kiln, etc.
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On Fri, 21 Jan 2005 14:30:09 -0600, Duane Bozarth

that's the difference between log run and mill run.
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