which wood glue

There are so many varieties of wood glue out that it makes the mind spin. 3 just in Titebond.
I'm a very amateur "wood worker", but I remember when it was just Elmers and Titebond. At the time I liked Titebond better because it sanded better as it was harder than Elmers.
So, I have a large number of wood frames to make. The wood will be either cypress or white pine ripped down to a 1/2" out of 2 x 6's and covered with 2 mil mylar on both sides ("storm" windows ). Joints will be either lap or butt.
I need moderate water resistance. Good gap filling. Able to work in cool weather and not take too long to set. The lap joints wont be nailed and I have a limited number of clamps. I don't care as much about sandability and extreme strength.
Recommendations? Currently on hand I have Titebond II and the newish (non foaming) Gorilla wood glue which I have doubts about.
Jeff
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TBII should do the job. Instead of gap filling, practice your cuts and setups to eliminate them. No glue can replace a perfect cut.
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On 11/13/2013 6:01 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

TBII it is.
I'm not bad at cutting up wood despite only having a miserable and patched together cut your fingers off Sears Radial Arm. Wood is not perfect though, at least what I have!
I'll see what I have to try dadiOH's clamp idea.
Cheers, Jeff
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<<..snipped...>>

Here's an old boat builder's idea that should work for those storm windows.
Get a length of PVS drain pipe, say 3 or 4" diameter. You can probably find a cut-off at a construction site dumpster. Cut it into 1" lenths, then make a single cut of across length of each piece, so that it can be spread open like the letter "C" They don't provide the clamping force of a metal or wooden clap, of course, but the price is right to make a whole lot of them...
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Larry W. - Baltimore Maryland - lwasserm(a)sdf. lonestar. org
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Normally I'd say the Titebond ll (or other yellow aliphatic) but it doesn't fill gaps, needs decent contact. Don't recall off hand about the cold weather but it would be a negative, I'm sure.
Epoxy, thickened, is great at gaps and is weather proof but it takes a long time to set, needs warmth and is not good with UV.
Offhand, I don't think there is a glue that meets your specs.
As far as limited clamps, go get a piece of 2 1/2" PVC pipe, cut off rings about 1" wide and make a slit in the rings; you now have a whole bunch of spring clamps which will work just fine for what you want. If you can find a glue :)
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j wrote:

Elmers

Five minute epoxy would be a choice, depending on how much strength you need.
But, if it were me, I would use Titebond II and rub sawdust into the joint to cover the gap, depending on just how big the gap was.
BTW, Ed had excellent advice. Take the time to make sure your joints are tight. Regardless of how strong the glue is, if the joint is poorly joined, you will have a weak joint.
Deb
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You need to go with Epoxy. Use T-88 from System 3. It is widely available, strong, will fill some gaps, totally weather resistant, sandable and dries about the color of pine sap.
I would NOT use any alphetic resin solution for a weather exposed project. I will admit TiteBond III does hold up to fricking incredible tests where t hey boil the wood for like 4 hours and freeze it and try to delaminate whil e it is still wet, etc. And it passes! I still find epoxy more reliable. Th ey use Epoxy for boats even as the actual exposed surface to the water and never alphetic resin based glues.
http://www.systemthree.com/store/pc/T-88-c27.htm?gclid=CP60qcnC4roCFaU5Qg odNEMAEg
I will admit T
Really nothing better for your application In My Not So Humble Opinion
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On 11/13/2013 1:50 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I ♥ T-88 !!
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On 11/13/2013 2:50 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

The frames will all be under a layer of SunTuf polycarbonate with a UV top coat.
I think the TBII is sufficient.
But, I have a friend that recently made a hot tub that doesn't hold water. He's got some ugly hard gray epoxy that he claims is the cats meow, I'm not impressed. I'll suggest T-88 but he's the kind of guy that believes what he believes, against all evidence.
Jeff

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<...snipped...>

I've never tried the non-foaming Gorilla glue you speak of, but I've built several outdoor projects with TBII over the years. At least one that I can think of is more than 12 years old without any glue-related problems.
I wouldn't hesitate to use TBII for the project you describe.
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On 11/13/2013 6:03 PM, Larry W wrote:

+1 Me neither.
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On 11/13/2013 6:03 PM, Larry W wrote:

And I might add that several years ago when TB III was new and tested among other glues TB II tested more water resistant than TB III.
FWIW the Water Proof TEST that is used to classify a glue as Water Proof, is in reality a water resistance test. In the common knowledge/definition of water proof, TB III is not.
The Gorilla, non foaming wood glue, is very similar to TB II except it is white in color. and is not a polyurethane based glue. I have used it with no issues. Right now I an working off of a gallon of Extended Time TB II that is white and dries clear.
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