Where's Norm's TS spliter

Page 1 of 5  
I been watching for awhile and he never uses one? I find on my TS the splitter can be more of a hassle then benefit. It's just too time consuming to keep it set up and straight... but I still use it. For how much longer I don't know. Who uses it, and who doesn't, and why?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

splitter with homemade zero tolerance throat plate - small cheap and effective and unobtrusive.
<http://www.grip-tite.com/splitter.html
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

None of the table saws in my shop have splitters, I've never seen them used in any cabinet shop. In all my 37 years of cabinet making I've never found a use for splitters. b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I kinda find that hard to believe. Well it did take me about 25 years to realize the value of a splitter.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If a board I'm ripping starts to close up after the blade I lift it straight up and toss it into my kindling pile. It will warp again regardless of how straight you get it with sawing. b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

That's not exactly the point. When it closes up it could kick back. The goal of the splitter isn't to save the board, it's to save your body.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He didn't suggest that the goal was to save the board, he was saying that he uses a different technique to mitigate the risk of kickback - he chucks the bad wood.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Are you saying that doing it 37 years makes it right? My brother-in-law who has been woodworking for 40 years nearly took off three fingers last year because of a stupid action.
I'm old enough to have stories like yours but never use that as justification.
Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bull.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I use this.
http://www.rockler.com/ecom7/product_details.cfm?cookietest=1&offerings_id 889&sid989
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote in

I use a piece of ruler from an old combination square, slighty sharpened at the infeed side, and a slot cut in the bottom so I can loosen the bolt and take it out quick when I want to run a dado.
I don't think I've ripcut anything but plywood where I haven't been thankful that thing is there. I've watched boards come out of a cut and BEFORE the splitter there's a nice 1/8 kerf, and AFTER the splitter the two pieces are against each other so tightly you'd think they were clamped.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 08:42:26 -0500, "Woodchuck"

If you want a good deal on an unused splitter, stop by one of the pro shops in your area.
They are likely to have a number of them sitting around gathering dust.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Quite true. And the blade guards generally go on just before the OSHA guys show up and off after they leave.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never used a splitter in 30 some years. I have at times, had to keep pieces from pinching back together and a splitter would have done that without my efforts, but those have been relatively few. Some wood can have a mind of its own and try to close back up after the cut, but it's manageable in other ways besides a splitter. More often the need for a splitter is disguising the need for a proper table saw setup, or proper use of a tablesaw. I don't really have anything against splitters but my saws have never had one on them and I never installed one. I don't recall there ever being such a focus on splitters in the past, as there is now. It's common to hear that you must use a splitter and a guard today, but for decades people made sawdust without them and those folks are still making it today. My thoughts are use it if it makes you comfortable, don't use it if it doesn't. Just don't fall into believing that it's a must or that you are now safe just because you have the gear installed on your saw. It's still all about technique and setup. Mask one problem and eventually you'll discover another one as a result. Usually in a surprising way.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
You do, however, have to be willing to stand aside and let the wood go (or have a knee-kick ON/OFF) if you go without. No piece of wood is worth a reach. Been my philosophy on all machines.
Can probably count on my ten fingers the number of times I've had to do that in over thirty years, and most of them were with true poplar or elm, stuff that just doesn't behave. I bandsaw that stuff now.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Elm doesn't behave ? I've not much experience with it (thanks to Dutch elm disease), but our UK elms seem fairly benign.
Do you ever work larch ? Now big rips in larch are where I find the stuff hotmelt-gluing itself onto the splitter. I'm just glad it's not the blade.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Our elms are known for their interlocked grain. They shimmer with transparent finishes, but they're almost impossible to split (wheel hubs), and unpredictable on rips through quartered figure.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 14:53:36 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

I have to admit, I took mine off, because it was signifigantly more dangerous having the cheap one that came with the saw on then it was running the sucker without it. The problem was that no matter how much time I spent setting it up carefully, and wrenching the sucker down, it would invariably move on me, and cause the splitter to jam up against the end of the stock instead of sliding into the kerf. As far as I could see, this was not only making extra work for me, but actually increasing my risk of kickback by shifting the workpiece a little when it jammed. Perhaps I'll install a different one, or a riving knife if I can find one for my odd sized table (with it's odd sized blade insert- thanks, Delta) but it's more likely that I'm just going to have to continue to use the tool carefully.

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

There are pop-in/pop-out ones to minimize the hassle.

You'll get some who say "I do" and some who say "Pro's don't.". Well, I'm not a pro. I don't have daily experience with the tools or a slew of board feet under my belt. Seems to me a splitter's a little bit like a safety belt. Some wear 'em, some don't. Some folks have accidents with out them and walk away fine.
But there just might come the day, where you're thankful it was there. Personally, I need most of my appendages to earn a living. :)
How about this line of thought: The "cheapening" of power tools has been hashed to death here. In an age where bean counters hold court on par with the lawyers, dontcha think the manufacturers would drop them if they felt they were worthless?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm a pro and use it. Saves me sanding time. The edges of the wood that likes to move after being cut come out smoother.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.