Where is the Laguna LT16 made?

1. Does it make a difference where it is made?
2. Is the LT16 worth the money?
3. What is a comparable machine that is a better value?
4. How is the LT16 on resawing?
5. Is there new resaw saw worth the money?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Dan Shea wrote:

The Laguna is made in Italy. Most of the really good bandsaws out there seem to be made in Italy these days.

I assume you are asking if it's worth the extra money you'd pay above and beyond the various Deltas, Jets, and Grizzlies. I think only you can make that decision.

I've seen some of your recent posts asking about bandsaws, but I haven't seen anyone mention the MiniMax MM16 (http://www.minimax-usa.com/mm16.html ). If you're already pondering machines in this price range, you REALLY should give the MiniMax a serious look. It is also made in Italy (by Centauro, not the same company that make saws for Laguna). I chose the MM16 over the Laguna LT16HD after much research and pondering, and many others have done the same. Both the Laguna and MiniMax have features that could cause you to think that one is "better" than the other, but they are both very nice machines. Without going into great detail, my personal assessment is that the MiniMax is "beefier"; it has heavier wheels, a much stronger upper guide post and tensioning mechanism, a more powerful motor, and a bit more resaw height. The Laguna has the edge on refinement and aesthetics; it has a nicer fence, newly designed ceramic guide blocks, a better zero-clearance insert, a nicer paint job, and uh, I think that's about it.
Another thing that might matter to you is the customer service. MiniMax has the best customer service you could hope to ask for (check our their Yahoo discussion group if you want to see for yourself: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/MiniMax-USA /). By contrast, a large number of people here have come to the conclusion that Laguna's customer service is steeped in a foul aroma. You might also say that it SUCKS. If you decide to deal with them and have a better experience, by all means let us know.

Most of my previous comments were in reference to the LT16HD; the LT16 appears to be a new machine to replace an older 16" model; I haven't seen this new model (though my buddy has the old one). If you plan to use the full 12" resaw height, my guess is that the 2.5HP motor is going to be a bit underpowered for the job. The LT16HD and LT18 both have 3HP motors, and that motor seems to do a pretty good job, but even that is no match for the 3.6HP unit sported by the MiniMax MM16. If you're serious about these types of saws, I suggest that you try to attend some of the woodworking shows and see them in action.

Not unless resawing is the only thing you plan to do. If you get very far into other types of woodworking, you'll probably find yourself in the market for another bandsaw that can do the "general-purpose" stuff, since the resaw units weren't designed to run the smaller 1/2" or 1/4" blades that you need to do tight curves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Steve Turner wrote:

Austin TX, may be a bit more aggressive in their pricing etc. because they're the new kid on the block, relatively speaking.

Jersey facility, complete change of computer system, a move from Laguna Beach and the usual problems with over expanding. Things have gotten a lot better in the last year or so, though most of MiniMax staff are former LT employees.

Don't know about the LT16 but the LT16SEC with 2.5 hp 220-240V unit works pretty well if 1/16" thickness or thicker is what you're looking for - see link below. www.wood-workers.com/users/charlieb/Resawing1.html or here if you're talking about sawing up mini-logs www.wood-workers.com/users/charlieb/SentinalSawing.html

The new LT14 and the LT16 are being made in Bulgaria by a company that sounds like Stomana or Stomono or .... The LT16SEC, LT16HD and the LT18 series are Italian - Meber I beleave.
As for the 2.5 hp motor being perhaps underpowered, or the need for 3.6 or more hp - 1/2" 3 tpi blade works well and with much less friction/heat than an 1 1/2 or 2" blade that normally doesn't buy you anything unless your a lumber mill operation. Wider blades mean more tension which means ore wear and tear on bearings ...

My LT16SEC - with LT's ceramic guides will handle 1/4" to 1 1/4" blades without a problem, though I normally keep a 1/2" on it most of the time.
Just a little more info to add to the discussion
charlie b
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.