Where/how to oil Porter Cable radial arm saw


I just inherited an old Porter Cable radial arm saw (Speedmatic 89 - model K89) with my new house. Too heavy for the previous owner to haul away with him. I replaced the wiring yesterday, popped on a new blade and fired it up. It runs fine, but either it's inherently very noisy or it could use an oiling/greasing. My problem is that I don't see anywhere to oil or grease it! I searched extensively online and found no literature at all for this particular saw. Does anyone have any knowledge in this area? Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

There's a couple of pictures listed under radial arm saws at http://www.owwm.com/MfgIndex/Detail.asp?IDe0 . Is this what yours looks like? Definitely a different setup.
The fact that the motor spun up OK is a good sign - no need to worry about the motor windings.
Most motors are sealed, which means you can't lubricate it. If you grab the blade (with the power off, of course) and give it a spin, it'll probably do one of three things. If it spins smoothly but slows to a halt quickly, then your bearings are fine and there's probably not a lot you can do about the noise. If it spins smoothly and takes a while to slow to a halt, then your bearings have lost most of their grease, and are on their way out (but still OK to use). If it doesn't spin smoothly and/or makes an awful grinding noise, it's time to replace the bearings.
You can probably get the bearings replaced for $100 or so at an electric motor shop, but I don't know your motor. Before you do that, make sure there's no "fatal" problems with the entire radial arm saw, e.g. a bent arm, slop in the bearings the arm rolls on, etc.... This could include wear in non-adjustable parts or worn out parts that you can no longer obtain.
You also might want to give Porter Cable a call. Most of these tool companies are more than happy to help you out, and they may still have a manual or two lying around, and possibly help with spare parts.
Good luck!
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
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Thanks Michael! Wow - that speedmatic 88c is exactly what it looks like. I guess I'll give it a whirl and see what happens. Thanks so much for the great advice and information. BTW - If it was meant for an 8" blade and I put a 7 1/4" blade on it, would there be any repercussions?
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Better performance - the motor can produce more force because of the shorter distance (torque = force x distance, with torque being constant). Sort of like putting a bicycle into a lower gear. That's one of the nice things about a radial arm saw - you can put on a smaller blade to get a little more applied force. I have a 14" radial arm saw, but use a 10" dado and 12" blades for ripping and plywood. I only have one 14" blade.
If you buy a new blade for it, look for a blade that's meant for a radial arm saw. These blades have a lower hook angle than most of the blades you find. Typically it'll say it's for a radial arm saw (along with other saw types).
--
Michael White "To protect people from the effects of folly is to
fill the world with fools." -Herbert Spencer
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Something else to try in addition to the hand spinning is to take the blade off and turn the motor on. If it runs quietly, the noise may be a feature of the blade. Ever run this particular blade on any other saw? Some blades with holes and laser cuts and so forth can make a fair amount of whine or air noise or whatever.
bob g.
Michael White wrote:

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disassemble the motor to get at the bearings; after all, someone put it together. Jim
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You can get to the bearings. Mostly, if it's not old enough to have sleeve bearings, you can't get any grease into the bearings. They might have snap rings which will allow the seals to be removed. Modern ball bearings are a fantastic bargain. Most sizes are available and cheap. If you're down to the bones far enough to consider disassembly of the bearings, you're in a good position to replace them. Mike the shaft and the outer bearing race dia and thickness. Chances are somebody like Precision Bearing has something spec'd for exactly your application. (As someone else suggested, the best, first, direct approach is to contact PC. My suggestion regarding Precision Bearing or similar is if the approach to PC comes up dry.)
bob g.
Jim wrote:

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replying to stevesai, Rick wrote: Help. I'm restoring a Porter Cable 10" Radial Arm Saw (RAS-10). I need a blade guard and the anti-kickback pawl/rod. I appreciate any help. Thanks
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On Friday, June 24, 2016 at 11:44:04 PM UTC-5, Rick wrote:

RAS-10 must not be a complete model number...it doesn't get any hits!
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Considering the apparent illiteracy of Homeownershub posters, since they seem unable to read the posting date of the posts they respond to, there's a better than even chance Rick isn't even talking about a radial arm saw.
(the post he's responding to is from 2005)
John
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John McCoy wrote:

He is, probably. Porter Cable used to make at least 2 RAS...one used a 7+" blade, the other an 8". For whatever reason, they were referred to (by PC) as "Speedmatic 10".
They were odd ball saws, looked nothing like current RAS, were made in the 30s and 40s. I don't think he has a prayer of finding parts, don't think I would even want to.
http://vintagemachinery.org/photoindex/detail.aspx?id &51
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On Saturday, June 25, 2016 at 2:17:08 PM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

I'd take one...pretty cool!
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wrote:

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