When You Start Out As A Carpenter...

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Andy Dingley wrote: <snip>

botched experiments. Mine was building a gate frame to the backyard fence at my very first house. I'd just purchased my first router, so for the joinery on the frame I tried 1/2" dovetail joints on the pressure treated 2x4s. Two dovetails per joint, if I remember. Man, that thing twisted all to hell and back, even with the faceboards nailed on. I eventually had so much iron bracketing holding it together that it sagged into the ground from the weight of the brackets, screws and nails.
It would be embarrassing, but it's just too funny now.
H
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[...]

So how does/did a carpenter lay out M&T joinery?
--
Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Juergen Hannappel wrote:

Oh. Well, in a house that's under about 175 years old in the U.S., if it ain't butt joints it ain't joined. Toe nailing 2x4s took the place of M&T joints along about 1835 or so, though I have seen some barns built around 1839 with M&T joints.
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On Sat, 03 Sep 2005 09:10:23 +0200, Juergen Hannappel

on this continent he doesn't, unless he's a timber framer. we won't go there.
thems that do M&T are furniture makers.
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Tom Watson wrote:

I think we're a generation apart, but not that much had changed...

check
check
check
check
check, and check.

I had a run of hydes, then switched to a brand I can't remember right now...

by the time I started wearing nailbags it was all bottles of powdered chalk.

my first one was a stanley. now I have about a dozen, including at least one from athol. I still have the stanley, but it 'aint true no more...

my first one.... hmm... not sure. the first one I seriously used for carpentering was a 20oz vaughan on hickory....

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On 2 Sep 2005 22:40:08 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

This wasn't used for a chalk line. It was used to make marks on items that were going to be cut out.
Let's say that you are fitting a solid backed vanity to a wall. The chalk would be rubbed onto the pipe that stuck out the most and then the cabinet would be set against the pipe. The chalk left on the back of the vanity would mark the outline of the pipe, or close enough to cut it within the limits of the escutcheon.
Then you worked your way back.
It was also used to rub on the edge of a scribed line to see how the fit needed to be adjusted.
Tom Watson - WoodDorker tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1/ (website)
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Tom Watson wrote:

interesting. I wonder when that fell by the wayside. I guess I have seen that chalk for sale, once or twice, but rarely, for sure. I learned fitting with transfer color as a carver, usually using china white or prussian blue. the few times I've been called to fit with transfer color as a carpenter I've improvised with whatever is at hand- often keel, but I have used stick chalk and even sharpie. I've even used carbon paper. heh, that'll date me...
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Tom Watson wrote:
<<The happiest day of my life was when I had become too valuable to be sent for coffee. That was before Self Esteem was even invented.<<
Sombitch... I just about fell off my chair when I read that. No kiddin'...
I remember going to the convenience store to get coffee, cigarettes, and ALWAYS winding up short. I was so intimidated by the guys I worked with I made it up out of my own pocket on laborer's wages.
I think of the guys that would break the bands on a lift of 2X4s and have me carry 140 out of 144 to where they were working across the site while the forklift sat in the shade. I remember being told every day with complete conviction on the part of the tellers that I was so damn stupid that I should consider myself lucky, no... privileged that they would explain ANYTHING to me.
I remember when they started to let me eat lunch with them. The first times I got to drive the crew truck; the first time I was left "in charge" for an hour or two. And then finally after about 9 to 10 months I was invited to go for a beer after work. I wasn't invited to stay, but I had a couple and then was chased off.
Damn that was all a long time ago. It almost seems like another person as I sit here in front of the computer on Sunday night, instead of being outside on the patio with a beer sharpening my steel blades (wellllll before carbide) getting ready for the week.
But now things have changed. My guys all cost too much for me to have any goofing around "dogging" the new guys. And now I have learned the hard way, that the old ways that we were brought up into on the job site are offenses for which you can be fined or sued. I have been before the Texas Workforce Commission enough times to learn the ropes. So none of that hazing exists on my jobs anymore for a lot of reasons. Besides, all the folks that come out to work today simply won't tolerate any "injustices" from their employers.
Thanks for the memories Tom... now knock it off. I can feel a funk coming on. I really miss some of the old guys I worked with after I finally became an accepted member of their community. Some were really good guys, and it meant a lot to me to gain some respect from them.
Robert
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They always did. Difference is, now you are paying for it.

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