WhatWreckWas

Page 1 of 2  
Web Images Groups News Froogle more Advanced Groups Search Preferences Groups Search result 2 for group:rec.woodworking author:paul author:radovanic Woodworking Enjoy the images throughout our website and photo gallery! tropicalhardwoods.com Sponsored Links Woodworking Machinery Industrial Recovery Services The Woodworking Auction Specialist! www.irsauctions.com Rockler Woodworking Store Hard-to-Find Woodworking Items. 50 Years in Business. See Our Sales www.Rockler.com Search Result 2 From: Paul T. Radovanic ( snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net) Subject: Re: Do you lift or drag your plane back at the end of a stroke? View: Complete Thread (16 articles) Original Format Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Date: 2001-09-02 07:34:08 PST
I rarely mention this, but I stopped lapping plane soles to perfection a long time ago.
This is only my own personal experience, so take it for what it is worth.
I found that soles lapped to a mirror finish caused *more* friction/resistance, or whatever you want to call it.
Stopping at 320 grit seems just about perfect. The sole doesn't get as warm, and the plane is easier to use.
I have no clue as to the "injuneering" reasons for this. I'm strictly an "empirical Galoot" -- I believe my own eyes and experience. This works for me.
Paul Rad
Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Web Images Groups News Froogle more Advanced Groups Search Preferences Groups Search result 3 for group:rec.woodworking author:paul author:radovanic DefyStain.com Defy Epoxy Fortified Wood Stain. Free Shipping. Services in Detroit. Defystain.com Sponsored Links Lacquer Spray Wood Stain Fine finishing lacquer spray stain variety of pigments to choose from www.Architecturals.net Global Connections -SLU Bamboo, laminate, hardwood flooring We distribute everywhere www.globalconnectionltd.com Search Result 3 From: Paul T. Radovanic ( snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net) Subject: Re: Paduak bleeding into finish View: Complete Thread (7 articles) Original Format Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Date: 2001-08-27 17:57:04 PST
On Mon, 27 Aug 2001, Tom Wicke wrote:

Tom,
The answer is yes, you can. Shellac makes a great sealer -- much better than lacquer. And the two go together very well. In many cases, some woods would drink up lacquer endlessly for days, but shellac will seal it right up in one or two coats.
Now, I've never done a segmented turning, and I have only a little experience at turning and finishing padauk. So consider this speculation based on limited experience.
The trick is going to be applying the first coat or three of shellac in *very* thin layers to the padauk only, so it dries lickety-split. If you apply a thicker layer, the liquid alcohol has a longer time to dissolve and 'draw up' the red. If this is a solid ring of padauk, I would probably do this with an artist's paint brush; no big deal. If the segments are small pieces randomly interspersed throughout the vessel, it might drive you to inventing new words. ;^>
Once you have that first sealer coat or two applied this way to the padauk, I would wipe on a full coat of shellac to the entire vessel. Then again, I would more likely apply five or six coats so that I had enough build to sand it smooth without cutting back to raw wood. Then you can begin to build your lacquer coats.
Oh, I would use only dewaxed blonde shellac for this.
As always, experiment first.
HTH,
Paul Rad
Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Web Images Groups News Froogle more Advanced Groups Search Preferences Groups Search result 4 for group:rec.woodworking author:paul author:radovanic ServiceMaster Clean Upholstery cleaning from industry experts. Free home consultation. www.servicemaster.com Sponsored Links Upholstery Cleaner Cleans & Deodorizes Pesky Stains. Cleaning the Safe & Responsible Way www.OurHouseworks.com Wood Stains Save on Thousands of Great Products Shop Online and Save at Target.com www.Target.com Search Result 4 From: Paul T. Radovanic ( snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net) Subject: Re: Black walnut sapwood View: Complete Thread (14 articles) Original Format Newsgroups: rec.woodworking Date: 2001-08-26 18:54:53 PST
First of all, I agree with leaving sapwood as is --*IF* you took that into consideration when you designed the piece and laid out the wood for grain alignment, etc. I glued up a tabletop, aligning the sapwood edges. It made five boards look like three, and the overall color is excellent.
You're dealing with sharp contrasts, just as if you were to use maple and walnut together. Sapwood can add beauty, but if it isn't laid out correctly within that dark heartwood, it can be gaudy and awkward.
There are times when you want to color it. You can use the darker stains; it's a personal preference. My personal favorite is to use a honey/amber water-based dye, and apply it only to the sapwood, sort of blending it in to the heartwood areas. I like my walnut to be multi-colored. The honey/amber is not a stark contrast, and it compliments the heartwood.
I use either Clearwater Color Co.'s Honey/Amber gel dye, or Homestead Finishing's Transtint flavor. Homestead doesn't call it "honey/amber" -- I think they call it Golden Brown -- ask the owner, Jeff Jewitt at http://www.homesteadfinishing.com he'll answer right away.
HTH,
Paul Rad
On Sat, 25 Aug 2001 12:37:21 -0600, "Dean Lapinel"

Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And what the wreck should strive to be.
The mirror finish will make for more friction as thee is more surface contact between the plane and the wood. Something to be aware of. Ed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski suggested...

In general, that is not the case. The greater contact area should not increase the total friction because the total downward ("normal") force remains unchanged. Since this constant normal force is now distributed over a larger area, the force per unit area is lower. It can be shown that the increase in friction from the larger contact area is exactly offset by the decrease in friction due to the lower normal force per unit area.
Nonetheless, my own empirical experience does seem to match Paul's. I thought I had a reasonably good grasp of the sciences, and of physics in particular, but I readily admit to being baffled by this phenomenon. Anyone have another explanation? Perhaps it's just psychological???
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You also have the "vacuum" factor. (I'm sure there is a real term for it but cannot think of it at the moment.) If you take two highly polished pieces of metal, or sheets of glass, they tend to stick to each other. OTOH, you can usually slide them apart even if you can lift one away from the other. Perhaps this is over riding what I think of as friction?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Edwin Pawlowski wrote...

I think the correct term is wringing or wringability. I've also heard stiction used to mean this. IIRC, stiction is short for static friction. Sorta makes sense.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Wilson wrote:

If the two surfaces are sufficiently smooth, then there won't be any (significant amount of) air between them. Atmospheric pressure will hold them together.
I've heard that a pair of metal blocks so polished are called "Johansen (sp?) Blocks".
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto, Iowa USA
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

A quick experiment shows that you can get more than 15psi of force retaining these blocks together. It's not just air pressure.

I think Johansen was one of the makers for sets of gauge blocks. The name has probably become generic, like "Hoover".
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Cohesion is the term (the tendancy of like molicules to cling together). But I'm guessing that what you're experiencing there is not cohesion in the strictest sense of the word- it sounds more like the water present in the general environment is collecting in small quanities on your metal or glass, and the water's adhesive property is what is holding the two pieces together. Friction is the force that works against you when you slide the two pieces apart- not when you pull them apart.
Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

"Friction is independent of area"
Regularly voted "least convincing physical law in lab demonstrations". We know the theory, but the practice is such that friction varies considerably depending on surface condition and the overall area involved.
Friction between plane soles and timber is complicated. It does vary, I certainly don't understand why.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

True for substances sufficiently hard not to deform under load. Of which there are very few (one might think steel wheels on steel rails, but even railroads have to deal with it).
John
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Andy Dingley wrote...

In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. But, in practice, there is. Jan L.A. van de Snepscheut

Me, neither. The deformability idea might have some merit. I just wondered whether anyone had ever taken the time to seriously investigate it.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What about not being able to get air under the polished surface? Jo blocks stick together rather well, I've always been told this is due to the very smooth surfaces and absence of air (vacuum) between them.

See above, maybe?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you are talking about gauge blocks, the physics is entirely different, the blocks physically bind together. They are ground to a precision of several tens of micro-inches -- there is actual molecular binding occuring (at least as it was explained during sophomore physics lab). I doubt that his the phenomena being observed with a plane and wood.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Your arms aren't as tired from lapping the sole all day?

Aut inveniam viam aut faciam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip ancient wisdom>
Tom,
Here's the secret of the universe, just for you:
"Things Change"
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 19:51:15 -0600, Dave Balderstone

Politicians love to pigeonhole us.
I use the terms "liberal" and "conservative" in their true sense, not in the sense that the current crop of politicians have defined them. IOW, liberal means to embrace change, conservative means to resist change. I'm fer changing some things, agin changing others, as I see fit.
When Winston Churchill said (paraphrased) that we are all liberal at 20 and conservative at 40, he was not using the modern definitions. IMHO, he was saying that youth is for experimentation, but as we get older, we tend to want to preserve (conserve) the good things we found along the way. It's human nature.
As for the politicians' current definitions of the terms, this too shall pass. A hundred+ years ago, the Democratic Party was made up of conservative plantation owners, while the other side was referred to as the "Radical Republicans", who were interested in rapid change. The pols will continue to use whatever definitions that advance their agendas. Nowadays, they even debate what your definition of "is" is -- not to mention "vote" and "count" and "trust". ;^>
Paul Rad Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 Nov 2004 20:56:06 -0500, Tom Watson wrote:

With all due respect for Paully (and I have the utmost respect), todays version seems to be rooted in the definition of equality - whether you see it as concerning equal oportunity or equal outcome.
Practice your finish on scraps or you will practice on your project
-Paully Rad
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It really gets me that everyone in the country can operate an ATM -- even those who can't program their VCR's know how to operate an ATM. It would be a simple matter to install ATM-like machines for voting -- at far less than $10K a pop, I should think.
Why the hell are we using punch cards? Didn't Ross Perot make his billions off them? Is he still involved here?
Paul Rad

Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.