What type of sander do I use to sand under baseboard heaters for my hardwood floors?

What type of sander do I use to sand under baseboard heaters for my hardwood floors?
Home Depot didn't seem to know or offer anything forsale or rent for this.
I'd prefer to rent or buy an inexpensive hand sander. Not looking forward to moving any more great big sanders. It seems like there must be some type of hand sander with an edge that sticks out.
I rented a heavy belt sander & edger. The edger didn't get too close to the edge, and I need to remove the old dark varnish.
Thanks for any advice.
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Maybe remove the baseboards? Tom Work at your leisure!
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Tom wrote:

While that's an option, it's a lot of plumbing and I don't know about his house but in mine some of them are wedged in tight enough that I'd have to chip out some plaster to get them loose. Also I'd have to shut down the boiler for the duration and that means no hot water for anything.
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Probably best to go with a right-angle type random orbit. Be especially careful not to bend the vanes on the tubes if water heat, and remember, you only have to sand a touch past what's covered when the skirting is reapplied. No one will be able to see any farther.
That said, I'd take the old out chemically, first.

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How about a hand scraper! I am all for power tools, but even I break down and use a hand tool now and then. The price is cheap, and it's very effective!
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IIRC, TOH had a flooring contractor using a type of specialty sander that looked like an extended belt sander. It was designed just for sanding under radiators. I hate to just say DAGS, but I don't know where you can get one. Wish I could help more.....                         Mark L.                         
Nate Goulet wrote:

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Found it here http://www.hardwood-floor-sanders.com/details.asp?EquipID=supere
Nate Goulet wrote:

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How about this
http://www.boschtools.com/Tools+and+Accessories/Tools/prod_detail.htm?item_no 78VSK
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Leon wrote:

I'm curious--please note that I'm not trying to argue with you--have you tried it for sanding under baseboard heaters? The photos and manual don't give enough information to be able to tell for sure if it will just fit under the fins or not quite fit under the fins--it looks like it would be close either way. If it _does_ fit then it looks like it would be a nice solution. If anybody locally had one I'd take a look and report back, but they don't.
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No, I have not tried it under base board heaters. I have not tried it at all. I live in SE Texas and really am not all checked out on the clearance of base board heaters as they basically do not exist in this neck of the woods. Given that, I would assume and perhaps incorrectly that base board heaters may be mounted at different height from the floor. For all I know, this tool, if it would fit under a base board heater may not have the reach either. Furthermore, if the boards run parallel to the floor, this sander may introduce scratches that would not look too good going against the grain. But, it was a suggestion of which the original poster can look at and determine if the tool would fill the bill to his satisfaction. My first thought would have been a right angle ROS but that had been previously mentioned. This was my second choice.
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Leon responds:

Same height in all I've seen. There's enough edge on most rotary edging sanders to get under once the face plate is popped off. If that doesn't work, I'd suggest some kind of scraper. More work, but for the most part, baseboard heaters don't edge an entire room. Usually a couple 6' or 8' units are enough for the entire room, place under windows because that's where heat loss is greatest. Now, that doesn't take into account the heaters that are basically radiators and that are liquid filled. Those may take up a larger portion of the wall space.
Charlie Self "It is even harder for the average ape to believe that he has descended from man." H. L. Mencken
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Leon wrote:

Seem to be a damnyankee thing. I never saw them until I moved north of the Mason-Dixon Line.

Pretty much a commodity item. For anybody who's interested, <http://www.slantfin.com/pdf/fl30rr.pdf shows a typical unit withdimensions.

I didn't phrase it well, but that was my concern as well--looks like it will reach under for some distance but can't tell if it will reach all the way back to the wall without hitting the fins.

Like I said, I wasn't trying to start an argument--the things are hard to find to look at and I was hoping that you might actually have one that you could take dimensions off of. Didn't _expect_ that but was _hoping_. Should have made that clear.

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Charlie and you seem to indicate that the height is probably pretty close to the floor. Is there a shadow line under the base board heater? If so, sanding and refinishing may not really make an appreciable difference as it may always appear to be another shade in the shadow line. The scraper may be the best alternative.
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Leon asks:

Most units, very close to the floor. There is a shadow line, but it depends largely on how high the front cover starts. And you're right, a scraper is probably the best bet. It is often the easiest and fastest, too.
Charlie Self "It is even harder for the average ape to believe that he has descended from man." H. L. Mencken
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