What projects did you make in HS woodshop class?

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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 04:38:13 GMT, the inscrutable "Keith Carlson"

I had Wood Shop and Metal Shop in 1968. I also have a 1916 book by Varnum titled "Arts & Crafts Design" which was originally titled "Industrial Arts Design: A Textbook of Practical Methods for Students, Teachers, and Craftsmen." Tell JOAT there were no pansies back then. ;)
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Mon, Feb 21, 2005, 7:15am (EST-3) novalidaddress@di\/ersify.com (LarryJaques) says to say: " Tell JOAT there were no pansies back then.
Hmm, I gradgeeated in '58. They had 'em then. What happened, someone forget to water 'em?
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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Mon, Feb 21, 2005, 4:38am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@mchsi.com (KeithCarlson) asks: Was it a 4-mile walk to school? Uphill both ways?
Afraid it was only going on a mile, and yes, it was walked - rain, sunshine, snow, whatever. I think the only time I got driven to school was the first day. And only about half of it was uphill. Then when I was in the 7th grade we moved, and it was several miles to school, so I got to ride the bus. I was at the end of the route going to school, so got there fast. And, I was at the end of the route coming home, so spent about an hour or more getting home.
JOAT Intellectual brilliance is no guarantee against being dead wrong. - David Fasold
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, Owen Lawrence wrote:

Woodshop & metalshop was in the 8th grade. Made a few small things I can't even remember, and a potters whell for mum. It had a kick arm to keep a flywheel going. Metalshop was a center punch and the "biggie" was a firewood carrier/holder. It was a circular piece of sheet steel with 4 hunks of chopped off heavy aluminum angle rivetted to it for feet and a beefy hunk of aluminum bar rolled into a circle that wrapped arount the curved steel carrier for a handle. It was also rivetted to the steel shell. The wood carrier is still in mum's house though no more in use as she had a NG insert put in the fireplace. She's too old (93) to use the potters wheel, and it disappeared a few years ago, hopefully to one of her great-grandchildren.
- Doug
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"Owen Lawrence" wrote in message

Woodshop: cutting board(s), tall bookshelf and, of course, the requisite for that day and age, a counter top cookbook holder for Mom.
Metalshop: cast aluminum skillet, cast aluminum feed scoop, 6' tall birdcage.

Mostly baseball bat paddles for the other coaches in the district ... this was about 47 years ago and, unlike today, discipline was applied topically to the area where it was thought likely to make the most memorable impression.
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middle school: a small shelf consisting of a board and 2 plexiglass shelves. disappeared. fox head sihoulette (sp??) which I still have. In high school, for the beginning class, everyone made a bedside table out of wood of their choice (mine was pine :). I still have it, and now I understand why I got a poor grade on it! :). For the advanced class, I made this humungous computer desk out of oak ply and oak facing. That was a big heavy sucker. I designed it around my Atari 400 system at that time. got rid of that. Also made a few small pieces.
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The two I remember were the walnut crescent moon lamp and the wooden-based hammered copper ashtray. It's been a looooong time since I made them. 1967 for the ashtray, and Mom asked me if I wanted the crescent lamp back 2 years ago when she moved. (I didn't)
Thanks for the mammaries.
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Larry Jaques wrote:
<snip>

Is there you're trying to tell us?
;-) Glen
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Glen wrote:

Make that "Is there something you're trying to tell us?"
;-) glen
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On Mon, 21 Feb 2005 12:29:58 GMT, the inscrutable Glen

What, you haven't kept abreast?
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By great good luck, I made an 8-foot sailboat called a Sabot. I took woodshop in my senior year of high school because I knew I'd blow calculus and hate it. Our teacher in coastal San Diego was a sailor and had built a Sabot jig that one student per year got to use.
As I remember it, he spent all of his time helping students and never made anything for himself.
Bill
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, Owen Lawrence wrote:

At my HS, freshmen had only one choice for shop, "Introduction to the Industrial Arts". A quarter each of wood, metal, drafting, and electricity.
In that short quarter-long class, I made a simple bookshelf strictly with handtools. I still have it.
Sophomore wood was a semester and I built a small cherry chest. The wood teacher offered to buy it from me to give to his wife. I had real trouble coming up with the money for the materials, so I almost took him up on it. But, instead, it's sitting across the room from me. I also made my Grandmother a cutting board.
Sadly, there was just no way that I could pay for materials in later wood classes on my own. So I've had to wait for, oh, 15ish years to get going with it again.
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In my school district, 1 year of "industrial arts" for guys (home econ. for girls) was mandatory -- 8th or 9th grade.
The Industrial Arts class was one semester of mechanical drafting, and one semester of 'shop'. "Shop" was a smorgasbord -- learning how to set hand-set type, and running a manually-powered printing press; sheet-metal work -- building simple metal box (learning to use break, shear, tin-snips, and the 'spot welder'), also a funnel, with a rolled-wire rim (other tin- knocker tools, also forge-heated soldering iron, for water-tight joints in the body/spout; 'Forge' -- made a cold-chisel; *and* "wood shop". everybody did the same things: 1st project was one of those three-piece book racks. You know the type.
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Second project was a hand-carved bowl. shape, etc, up to the student, although overall dimensions were constrained.
For those who took shop in 8th grade, there was an 'optional' course for 9th grade. Hey! *power* tools. 1st two projects were 'required' ones: #1 was a knick-knack shelf/box. Not a terribly _practical_ thing, but you had to use quite a variety of joints -- miter, rabbet, dado, butt, "egg crate" (I forget the proper name of that one), and "I forget, completely" for the sixth one. :) And a five-sided piece of Masonite for the back. (to prove you could cut proper 'non-square' cuts when you needed to.
Second project was the traditional checkerboard. Underlying lesson was precision measuring _and_ cutting "counts". :)
2nd semester you could make 'what you wanted' -- had to have plans, and the teacher had approve it first. This was mostly to keep things down to a scope that _could_/_would_ get finished by the end of the school year.
I built a magazine table. working solely from an about 2"x2" picture from a 'kit' ad which ran in the Wall Street Journal.
For the 2nd question, the teacher didn't make *anything* -- he was *fully* occupied: (a) _asking_ questions of the students -- *LOADED* ones, like "what are you going to do about ....?" when somebody was about to barge ahead with something they hadn't thought all the way through. (b) _answering_ (not necessarily "constructively", but forcing 'education') questions from the kids -- "how do I do ..."; (c) _helping_ as needed -- there were frequent situations that called for "more than two hands", he provided an extra pair. Sometimes he even got a few minutes to just stand around and look at everybody "productively occupied". *grin*
Wood shop in high-school was more of the same -- "find a project you like, and build it".
I had discovered R/C model airplanes, and built a field toolbox for flying. from _my_own_ design and plans.
Also a faux "King George V" Library table.
And, senior year, a full-blown solid mahogany Dining Room table. Fixed frame, expandable top, with 4 drop-in leaves. Seated up to 14 people.
*MOST* of what the teacher did in the H.S. shop, was 'safety steward', stopping people from "doing something dumb" _before_ they did it. (In three years, I believe the *worst* injury was of the 'hit the nail on the thumb' variety.) And 'check testing' kids on the proper use of the various pieces of power equipment, to make sure they knew the proper safety procedures, before letting them use the gear themselves.
He was also available to answer questions about 'how to' perform a particular task, or assist in reading plans, or help in design/drawing ones own project.
"shop" _was_ an elective, so everybody present _did_ have at least a moderate background in woodworking, one way or another. This reduced the need to 'instruct', considerably. Many worked 'within the scope of their knowledge and/or experience', the rest were not afraid to *ask* for help/guidance when appropriate.
An apt description of the teaching 'style': lots of "guidance", very little "instruction".
Admittedly, this was all 'cabinetmaking', not 'construction trades'. And there is a big difference. :)
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Owen Lawrence wrote:

We had to outfit our new HS workshop space with storage: shelving, bins, racks, benches, etc. Made lots of box joints, torsion boxes, and combination low shelving/workbench units. Our teacher was a combination designer, foreman and screw up fixer. Those that came after us got to make fancy stuff: decorative boxes, turnings, small tables.
J.
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On Sun, 20 Feb 2005 09:36:43 -0500, "Owen Lawrence"

I remember only going to an 8th grade woodworking class once a week. In it, I made a gravity bookshelf. I think my mom still has it. Funny to think how long it took to make then, compared to now when it might take an hour or two.
There was an exploratory shop class in HS, but not much time spent in it due the relatively large number of shops the school had.
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Sorry to show my ognorance, but I'm not familiar with a "gravity bookshelf". Could you explain, please?
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Han
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It's a board held at an angle by putting a cleat on the underside at one across it's width. The other lower end gets a bookrest on the upper face of said board. In this case, it was three dowels joined at the top with a small block.
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Thanks LL! I've seen them, now you describe it.
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I took shop off & on from 6th grade up... first thing I remember making was a classic pukeyduck, which for some unfathomable reason still sits in the bottom drawer of our entertainment center. Then I moved on to a pencil holder, complete with routed base.
A few years later, I hit the big time :). In high school, got to use a lathe -- never actually made any project with it, just fooled around making various turnings. Shop was pretty varied at that school -- we were also taught welding (I passed, but that's the best I can say). The highlight though was getting to make a cedar sea chest (about 4'x2'x2'), with box- jointed corners & curved slatted top.
Of course, a few years later I gave it to my then-fiance... and another year after that we broke up, but I never did get the chest (get your minds out of the gutter!) back to get to my "true" SWMBO. Oh well...
-Richard, who couldn't bring himself to type "seaman's chest" for some reason.
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It was called Industrial Arts at my high school. Sophomore year it consisted of wood shop. I made a bookshelf. It took all year. I remember it wasn't very square. I think it earned a C grade. I had those shelves for many years after. Junior year was all drafting. Only 2 juniors in the class, myself and one other. All the rest freshmen. Didn't do so good in that class either. Senior year was shop again. More BS than anything else. Did learn about pinhole cameras though. This was in the early '70's. Joe
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