What is it? Set 499

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I need some help with the third and fifth ones this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Rob
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On 27/06/2013 4:03 PM, Rob H. wrote:

2908 Standard weeding fork
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3499/3928465158_dc6109f3ea.jpg
No ideas on the others!
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Yep, you nailed it!
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All new to me this week. One wild guess: 2907 A nutcracker. Not the kind of nuts we eat, the threaded metal kind that get corroded and frozen on plumbing fixtures.
On 6/27/2013 4:03 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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This seems to be the most popular suggestion for this tool, though I haven't had any luck yet on my patent searches for it.
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2907 - Perhaps a lever to immobilize a small, keyed shaft.
2909 - The handle is similar to those on timber framing slicks, but the tool's sharpened edges look too blunt to cut wood. Maybe it is a garden tool ....
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Posting from my desk top PC, as always.
2905 ice man's tongs? 2906, no clue 2907, pill splitter for elephant pills (or a nut buster for auto mechanics) 2908, carpet tack puller 2909, non sparking coal scoop. Part of the handle is missing, there is a T bar through the top loop. 2910, no clue.
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I need some help with the third and fifth ones this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/
Rob
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2905 lawn aerator tines
2906 C hook (predecessor to the S Hook)
2907 Braking rusted Nuts
2908 Weeding Fork
2909 Shovel from an toy truck
2910 electrical insulator
Robert
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Ha ha, I thought it might be easier to gauge the size if you could see more of the table, it doesn't cost me any more to add as many photos as I want so what the heck.

I still haven't found the answer for this shovel, I think they must have quit making this model.
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On 6/27/13 4:03 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2909: Barking spud from the 1940s or 1950s. Used to remove gritty bark from a log prior to sawing.
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Sounds like a good idea for it, though for now it remains a mystery until we can find a good reference.
Tough set this week, four of the answers have been posted, hopefully we'll get the other two in the near future.
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2013/06/set-499.html#answers
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On 6/28/13 3:55 PM, Rob H. wrote:

http://www.jonzimmersantiquetools.com/tools/spud_1.jpg
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On 6/28/13 7:00 PM, j Burns wrote:

http://www.jonzimmersantiquetools.com/tools/saws.htm
If you scroll down about 2/3, there a Miscellaneous heading. It's the first item.
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Great work on providing the answer! I'm sure the owner will appreciate it. Finding the patent was a lot easier after I knew the tool's purpose:
http://www.google.com/patents/US2693028
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    The strength of the support link suggests that this would be a reasonable use for the item.

    Hmm ... Item (2910) the two nuts were way too large for the kind of current needed to run the siren -- but perhaps built out of what was available. They (and the studs) look to be copper, brass, or bronze, all good choices for this kind of application.
    I wonder what voltage the siren was driven by. Given the locale, line voltage is unlikely to be available, so it could be from a vehicles starting battery, and the larger sie is perhaps better for that. Lower voltage means higher current for the same power.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Don't forget that you may be assembling this out in the woods. You want good solid wing nuts that you can tighten up with calloused fingers without losing them in the leaf litter.
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On 6/28/13 11:47 PM, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Before diesels, logging depended on steam. The whistle punk blew the steam whistle to signal the yarder operator controlling the movement of logs. He was also the safety lookout. I suppose the trigger allowed him to choose a vantage point and activate the whistle by a solenoid.
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I forgot to mention that it came from Vancouver Island, the person who bought it there said that a couple of people had verified that it was a switch for a signal.
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On 6/29/13 7:05 AM, Rob H. wrote:

This pages has links to several threads where loggers talk about whistle punks. One link has a video where a man uses a bug like the mystery item to make his dogs bark.
http://www.forestryforum.com/board/index.php?action=search2 ;search=Whistle%20Punk
The whistle punk was usually a teenager. He'd hook the bug to 1000 feet of 8-gage telephone wire. When a choker was set, he would give the men 30 seconds to get clear, then squeeze the bug, which activated a solenoid to blow the whistle, telling the donkey engineer to reel in the cable. When diesels took over, the whistle was called an air chime.
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Thanks for the link, some interesting stuff there.
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