What is it? Set 433

Page 1 of 2  
I need some help with the fourth and sixth items this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 22/03/2012 08:00, Rob H. wrote:

2510 is a hand-held lifting magnet
http://hand-tools.hardwarestore.com/67-414-magnets/magnetic-bulk-lifter-622967.aspx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

2514
Buddhist wall ventilator so termites do not suffer on hot days.
--
Gerald Ross

For discussion only. Not to be relied upon.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2509: Nut Cracker? 2510: Floor Puller for Computer rooms? 2511: Can opener? 2512: Piano keys? 2513: Jigs for marking lines i metal or wood? 2514: Spring puller / Cam lifter?
On 3/22/2012 4:00 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2509 Steak edge tenderizer 2510 magnet, with release and drop capability 2511 wine cork press 2512 some kind of tripod, or easel? 2513 some kind of shim, but for what? 2514 seriously no clue
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I need some help with the fourth and sixth items this week:
http://55tools.blogspot.com /
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

2512 just has to be a fence tightener! phil k.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2512 - I think it's some sort of fold-up removable leg support for a small fold down (hinged?) table top, shelving.... particular work surface, of some sort. Reminds me of the fold-up leg support for the old in-the-wall ironing boards. Once it is in its hyper-extended position, it is stable when the support angle is opposite the "knee" (flexed) joint.
Sonny
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 3/22/12 4:00 AM, Rob H. wrote:

2514: The ID looks like 1.25". The OD of hose threads is 1.06". I imagine the female end of a garden hose would go through it.
You can't get water if somebody parks on your hose, and being run over can't be good for it. If you used wire to suspend a hose above a driveway, it would probably a kink. With a tube, kinking would be less likely.
If it was found in a deck as pictured, that could be a secondary use. Suppose your outdoor tap is on your deck. Suppose the queen is always dropping in for tea, and you have to get the hose out of the way so she won't trip on it. If it's run through this device, you just unscrew the hose from the tap and let it slide. The female end won't go through, so it will be ready to hook up when she leaves.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'll ask the owner what he thinks of this idea.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Well, looks like this one is still a mystery, the owner thought that it could be possible but I would agree that it's hard to say at this point.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Rob H. wrote:

What is #6 made of? Unable to determine if it is wood, copper or ceramic from the picture.
--
Gerald Ross

For discussion only. Not to be relied upon.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I thought it was ceramic when I posted it this morning but found out this afternoon that it's actually wood.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A tongue puller from the Inquisition? Or an upholsterers tool to grasp leather/fabric? Art
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2509)    For joining two sheets of thin metal. The spikes on each side     fall between those on the other (are there more than one on     the near side?) punching both sheets of metal and forming them     into spikes surrounding the punch-through and then folding them     down to clasp the two sheets together.
    Are these really bronze as they appear, or is it a trick of     illumination? If they are, then it was also designed to be used     in the presence of flamable gases or perhaps powders like     airborne flour or gunpowder.
2510)    A magnetic pick-up and release tool. Pick up by the red handle     and whatever pieces of steel were on the aluminum capped side     will stick and be lifted. Pull the uncovered handle, and the     permanent magnet will be withdrawn to a position where the field     is magnetically shunted, and it will release what it has picked     up. (Or possibly rotate the uncovered handle, depending in the     internal design.)
2511)    Too few angles of view. At a guess, the upper strap loop grips     a cylindrical object, and lowers it into the 'V' notch on the     foot. I *think* that the loop hinges near where the toothed arc     pivots, so the angle of the cylinder can be changed, and the     toothed arc serves as a ratchet to select a specific angle.
2512)    A lever for lifting something fairly heavy. The 'V' notches on     the two feet fit on a rod, and another rod is placed into the     notch at the wide end of the long lever. By then pushing down     on the narrow end, the part in the notch is lifted.
    As to exactly what it is lifting -- that I don't know.
2513)    Interesting forms of guided thin chisels. Looking at the right     hand end of the bottom one shows that it is hammered to drive     the inner chisel blade. The other guide has a chisel surface as     well. But I really don't know what they are applied to.
2514)    No dimensions given -- other than by the porch planks.
    Looks as though it hangs from something (perhaps a tree branch     or a nail driven into a tree trunk) and holds some form of     pyrotechnic -- or serves a a small cannon. A closer look at the     other end, showing whether it is open or closed might help, and     especially if it showed a small hole for a fuse.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

handle
We used to call them "nutso". The guy who spilled the box of nuts on the floor got to use the Nutso to pick them all up!
Lloyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
2510: Manual bulk Tape de-magnetizer.
On 3/22/2012 4:00 AM, Rob H. wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    Not a very good one, since it is permanent magnet. A proper tape degausser uses an AC field which decreases as it is slowly moved away from the tape (or the tape is moved away from it) resulting in very little residual field.
    This one would result in lots of hiss if used in that way. (I know this, because my first tape recorder -- a Wilcox-Gay -- had a permanent magnet erase head, and it was *very* noisy as a result.
    So I will stick with my earlier posting (and duplicated by others) as a parts pickup tool.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tough set this week, some of the answers have been posted here:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2012/03/set-433.html#answers
Been really busy recently, had to throw a set together and hope for the best, some weeks I have a lot of hours to devote to the site and others I'm not home long enough to give the proper amount of time to getting a set together and replying to posts. Just wanted to explain why sometimes I post a lot of replies and other times hardly at all, thanks to everyone who participated this week!
Rob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

    O.K. So (2511) is a mica undercutter from back before the days of a powered small circular saw blade being used for the purpose. This was done after turning the commuator to smooth the surface. The mica was electrical insulators between the copper segments.

    Thanks for putting them up.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
--
Remove oil spill source from e-mail
Email: < snipped-for-privacy@d-and-d.com> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I made an undercutter for my little 6x18 Atlas. It looked a lot like a very miniature cutoff tool, except it was used lying on its side, and had the blade ground at an angle so it would lay flat when exactly on the centerline while held in a lantern toolpost. Tricky bit of grinding, that.
One advanced it into the work with the cross slide, and did the cutting with the longitudinal feed wheel, while the spindle was locked.
I repaired a LOT of small motors with that thing before I quit doing it. I only ever made the one, and made it 0.015" thick, which worked for everything -- multiple passes on wider slots and slight over-cut on narrower ones (of which there weren't many).
LLoyd
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.