What is it? Set 407

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On 9/23/11 5:03 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Do you know what model Planet Jr the cast-iron cultivator went with? Here's a Planet Jr tractor that doesn't look as if it would fit that attachment. For that matter, the piece with 6 tines and 2 disks doesn't appear to be attached.
http://www.smokstak.com/gallery/showimage.php?i 168&catid=newimages
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I don't know what model it went with, on the top of it were the words Planet Jr though I shopped them out before posting the image. The company has been around quite a long time so I'm sure they've had a lot of different models.
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We had one like that way back in time. I think Dad bought it for the tobacco rows and vegge garden in Winston-Salem in '46 or 7.
I remember when he finally decided it was to big for a normal house. Sadly he sold it - but found a home for it.
Martin
On 9/24/2011 11:58 AM, Rob H. wrote:

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On 9/24/11 12:58 PM, Rob H. wrote:

Here's the frame of a wheel hoe. The mystery item seems to have the same teeth but an entirely different frame.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?VISuperSize&item 0701497298
OTOH, here's a walking tractor from about 1943. The cultivator frame and teeth are nothing like the mystery item.
http://www.smokstak.com/forum/showthread.php?t 530
I wonder about the models the company produced in the 1930s.
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On Fri, 23 Sep 2011 18:52:33 -0400
<snip>

There is an old Planet Jr catalog at Archive.com. See:
http://www.archive.org/details/cu31924084885676
Look closely at the picture on page 8 (real page 4) in the document at the accessory pieces laid out. I studied the whole catalog earlier this morning before looking at the answers and thought that these were pretty close but not exact...
--
Leon Fisk
Grand Rapids MI/Zone 5b
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    Likely.
    Hmm ... some comments:
2353)    This means that you did not show the back side, but two shots of     the front side, while I thought that you were walking all the     way around it taking photos from all angles, thus my comment     about there being no obvious way to drive it.
2357)    You could likely determine what was in the tanks by unscrewing     a cap and sniffing. Even after that much time, if it had been     gasoline or kerosene, you should have been ablet to tell by     smell.
    And if it was some kind of attractant, you could tell by that     too. But if it had an attractant, I don't see the need for the     door. That would give neither the access needed for relocating     a swam into a new beehive, nor for smoking them to make them     docile.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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2357 - Rather than an attractant device, it may be a repellant device. Fruit tree growers, long ago, here, would fill small bottles with kerosene, put a cloth wick in the top and hang them in their trees to keep bugs from the fruit, especially plum and peach trees, where the plum curculio (insect) would ruin the fruit before it ripened. The odor would repell the insects. Maybe this box device had a similar repellant purpose.
Sonny
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I'll add this to my list of possible answers, though I'm not sure how the large container fits in with this idea.
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I sent the owner an email about five days ago asking to check the small tanks for any type of odor but haven't heard back from him. I'm not 100% behind the swarm catcher theory, but I haven't heard any better ideas for it. I've shown it to a lot of farmers but none of them recognized it.
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I just heard back from the owner of the tin container, I had asked him to see if there was any smell in it or the tubes and he said there was none.
I forgot to mention earlier that I'll be posting on Wednesday this week instead of Thursday.
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What I can figure for most has been posted so I'll only weigh in on 2357.
(BTW near me there must be a leaking cable housing, there is a whole nitrogen tank connected up to the line, changed out regularly)
OK, the tanks are connected to that material and likely drip/wick the contents into the material, only time I've seen this is to saturate a curtain that an animal has to walk through, but that doesn't seem likely here.
I'm going to guess something is supposed to burn inside the big box, and the heat and convection helps carry off whatever is in the tanks that is supposed to evaporate off the wicks. Little door looks just right for lighting something or controlling the draft.
Dave
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wrote:

I've shown this to a lot of people and a number of them have guessed that the tubes hold fuel and the wicks are burned for heat for one purpose or another, the main problem with this idea is that the wicks are riveted to the tubes and can't be replaced, and they are hanging with the wicks down instead of up. The small hole with the sliding door is the only opening in the big container, so it wouldn't have enough oxygen to burn anything inside for very long.
This item belongs to a 70 year old man who got it from his father who was a farmer and beekeeper, I've shown it to some beekeepers and none of them recognized it, although some have guessed it's for catching a swarm of bees with the tubes holding some kind of attractant that is dispersed through the wicks. This is the best guess that I've heard for it yet.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote the following:

Most have correctly identified 2358 as a tank tread, but I will go a little further. It's from a WWII US Sherman tank
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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wrote:

2353: chipper or crusher 2355: anchor 2356: a chart recorder of somekind. The chart shown doesn't look like a seismograph though, and the mechanism in the bubble doesn't look like a seismograph. Maybe it records barometric pressure.
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On Thu, 22 Sep 2011 04:10:27 -0400, Rob H. wrote:

2354- track greaser going into a curve to prevent side pressure from wearing out wheel flanges and rails.
basilisk
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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
2353)    An interesting, and puzzling device.
    Obviously intended to rotate.
    The look of the edge suggests that it has not been towed along     rolling on a surface.
    The raised ridges are not shaped to act as cutters of any sort.
    Both sides have the outer row of ridges tilted to point CCW when     viewed from that side, so they are pointing in opposite     directions.
    There is no obvious provision for applying power to the axle to     spin it.
    So -- it must be spun by a stream of whatever -- perhaps grain     which hits it. Or perhaps water under pressure -- serving as     some form of irrigation sprinkler.
    At about 30" diameter, and what appears to be 1" thick, it must     be significantly heavy. About 0.13 cubic feet -- I would have     expected more before calculating.
2354)    O.K. -- the "Buried Cable" marking below it supports my initial     thought. Cables -- in particular telephone cables, were at one     time fed pressurized neutral gasses such as nitrogen to keep any     leaks from letting water in.
    Usually, there is a compressed gas tank and regulator connected     to the cable every so many miles. This would appear to be     something else, perhaps a splice box to give access for     maintenance (once the pressure is removed).
2355)    Some form of cultivating plowshare. It bolts either to a hose-drawn     plow or to a tractor. Not a hand-pushed plow, because the     offset would make it unbalanced and difficult to push.
2356)    7-day barograph (recording barometer). A wind-up spring to drive     the drum. I'm not quite sure what the dome is for, however.
2357)    Some sort of oven for perhaps heat curing something. Not hot     enough for heat treating metals however.
    There are two tanks with edge-fed wicks below them designed for     heating the walls of the enclosure. (It *might* be that this     would be a very smoky flame, in which case it could be used as     a "smudge pot" for protecting orchards from freezing.
2358)    Two sections of a tank tread for use on paved roads. An     earth-moving machine (bulldozer or the like) would have blades     which would dig into the soil, but which would also damage paved     road surfaces.
    Now to post this, and then see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 22 Sep 2011 20:15:47 GMT, DoN. Nichols wrote:

I was thinking it could be ab alarm box to A sensor connected to the cable if the pressur drops past a certen point it would send a signal to the exchange that that cable has developed a leak or has been damages an a crew is sent out to check and fix, easy if the damage is obvious a pain in the But if not (been their done that)

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    [ ... ]

    O.K. That makes sense. Out of curiosity -- how do you drain the pressure prior to opening it? I did not see a bleeder valve obvious. Granted, if there were a major leak between the tank and the alarm box, that would not be a problem -- but if you need to replace the sensor (or recalibrate it) in the absence of a significant leak, that could be a pain -- you would have to send someone else to the upstream and downstream tanks to shut off the valves -- and presumably to operate bleed valves there, too.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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On 25 Sep 2011 00:12:39 GMT, DoN. Nichols wrote:

Usally there was a valve (here in New Zealand we had the same type as on a car tire) you would bleed the air out do the biz then remove the valve from the valve stem and replace the top and seal then replace the valve and if necessary you could bring it back up to pressure with a tank on the vehicle, Anoter thought has struck me it could have been a loading coil pot as well some time in the Long runs every now and then you had to put loading coils and a check finds this
http://davewhitmore.net/Images/field.htm
About half way down the page.
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    [ ... ]

    [ ... ]

    In particular:
    <
http://davewhitmore.net/Images/field/SanibelRepeater2.jpg
which has the same pressure warning markings, though it is a slightly taller container, and it appears to be a repeater in there, based on the stick-on letters.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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