What is it? Set 391

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J Burns wrote:
(...)

Finial mould and the residue is flux?
--Winston
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I dunno...that looks all the world to me like some sort of detachable check valve. The little metal tab with "JWW" stamped on it would be the clapper, and the inlet and outlet pipes would be flanged to sit in the device. Probably had a couple of gaskets to keep the steam/water/ whatever inside, and the whole thing could be screwed on. The nubbins and springs tell me that it was meant to fail under tremendous pressure rather than blow out, then slip back into place.
--riverman
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2261
end button on wire item e.g. our 1970's vintage metal (painted blue) clothes horse there's a bent wire that holds the horse open, with another piece that is "flippable" to allow the horse to be stowed.
I'd post a picture but a) where? and b) SHMBO has the camera!
--
"Nuns! NUNS! Reverse! Reverse!"

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2257. Glasses to strengthen "lazy eyes" (amblyopia) by forcing the eye(s) to look through the center? 2258. Bearing or watch press? 2259. Physics toy/puzzle. Turn it over and the hourglasses switch positions, but only after the sand runs out of the hourglasses. The puzzle is to explain why they do not change positions immediately. Answer (Rot13): Gur fnaq va gur hccre unys gvcf gur ubhetynffrf, pnhfvat gurz gb fgnl va cynpr guebhtu sevpgvba jvgu gur ghor fvqrf. 2260. Scrubbing pad for use in the bath? 2261. Decorative "snap on" button?
Carl G.
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Correct, this is the answer that I was looking for, although in the comments on the web site someone said it's a Newton's Gravity Sand Timer, I found some of these on the web and they are described as an hourglass that floats in water, with no mention of the puzzle. To me the most interesting part of the device is the puzzle of the delay in movement, seems odd that they don't mention it and only market the item as a decorative hourglass.
Rob
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I've got one of these I bought at Hobby Lobby a week or two past. There is an implication that the position of the sand controls the position of the timer within the outer shell. This is not true. The mass and volume of the timer remain constant, therefore the boyancy remains constant as well. What controls the movement (ascent/descent) of the timer through the liquid is the viscosity of the liquid. If you choose the right liquid, and get the weight just right, the sand will run out just as the timer reaches the antipodal position. Mine has a low viscosity clear liquid (water?) so the timer quickly floats to the top before much sand has moved. It has black sand, and is a one minute timer. They had similar timers with red sand. I don't know if they measured the same elapsed time - will have to check next trip (if they have any left...).

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...so the timer quickly floats to the top before much sand has moved. ...
Sounds like it doesn't work the same as the hourglass puzzle, I'm guessing the hourglasses are too light weight so a little friction wouldn't be enough to keep them in place for short amount of time.
I would say that we've got the right general answer for the buffer and mold but I haven't been able to find out any specifics on them.
The other four have all been correctly identified, more information on them can be found at the link below:
http://55tools.blogspot.com/2011/06/set-391.html#answers
Rob
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It just occurred to me that 2260 is a baren used for block printing. When you have inked the printing block and put the paper over it, the baren is used to apply pressure to make the ink evenly transfer to the paper. <http://www.samflaxsouth.com/Prod-39-1-2449-987 / Speedball_Red_Baren_4.htm> and <http://autonopedia.org / crafts_and_technology/Printing/Wood-Block_Printing.html>. I happened to remember that "baren" is a Japanese word.
Northe
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Sounds good to me, I think this is correct, I couldn't find a porcelain one but a baren is the only thing I've found that looks like 2260. I just updated my answer for this one. Thanks!
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2257: old shooter's glasses -- clear center part lets the shooter see the sights while the ground glass surround prevents distraction and amber color improves contrast.
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#2257 Early foggles for IFR training? #2260 Could be a loufa holder for the shower, or maybe an ink blotter. #2261 Decorative furniture button
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2258: maybe for making a lead hammer? These are a common item for machinery setup, and when they get out-of-shape, you just melt the head down and cast a new one (around a steel-pipe handle). Usually see these with left/right mold halves, though. Or a mold for a Babbitt metal bearing, perhaps?
2261: decorative top for a shirt stud. The stud is small and fits through the hole in the shirt, then you clip this top bit over it.
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