What is it? Set 327

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#1877 Safecracker's toolkit. On topic for rec.wood, note that the breast drill is adapted so as to pack flat.
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wrote:

If that's correct, then the flask is definitely NOT black powder, which would be useless in blowing a safe. On the other hand, the "pitcher" with the long spout in the upper left could be used to drip nitroglycerine in through a bored hold.
I think that's it, Andy.
LLoyd
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Yes, these items were used by a safecracker, though I'm not sure of the purpose of the device at the bottom of the photo, looks to be some type of heater.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album11/pic1877a.jpg

The text below is from the link that follows, it mentions the use of black powder in opening a safe:
"For gunpowder (blackpowder) to be charged into a mechanism such as this would require that a hole be drilled through the door plate. This would have been done using either a belly brace or ratchet drill.
This was not always necessary however as in the early days the keylocks were capacious enough to accept enough black powder, which, being detonated in such a confined space could remove the lock cap and bolt allowing the boltwork to be withdrawn."
http://peterman.org.uk/constanddest.htm

I think both tools at the top were for blowing black powder into the keyhole or a hole drilled in the safe.
Rob
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On 11 Mar, 16:27, "Lloyd E. Sponenburgh" <lloydspinsidemindspring.com> wrote:

Blackpowder was used for a very long time in blowing safes. Unlike Hollywood, the trick wasn't to "blow the safe" (ie burst the case) it was merely to disrupt the lock. The solution to this was simple, the "powder proof lock" which was strongly constructed but also designed so that it had little internal empty space (sometimes by merely adding a wooden filler plug to an existing lock). This meant that there was no longer enough space to get a fill of the relatively weak black powder in place.
Nitroglycerine in US safe-cracking practice was merely a more powerful explosive. There was still enough room in a powder-proof lock that it could be disrupted with a nitroglycerine charge. The solution to this was the development of relockers - mechanical devices that if the lock mechanism was destroyed would simply wedge the bolts in place permanently (it was then a long and noisy task for a locksmith to dismantle the safe, often requiring a replacement safe).
The British "gelly boys" developed a rather more sophisticated approach. Having had military experience of high velocity explosives, they realised that a shock wave could be used to cut the plate of the safe, without destroying the contents too. A hole was drilled in the plate and their secret weapon deployed on the inside - a condom. This was then filled with nitroglycerine (made at home by extracting it from commercial gelignite). Because of the good contact, the shock wave from a small quantitiy of nitroglycerine was enough to break the safe plate (and the more hardened it was, the better).
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On Fri, 12 Mar 2010 02:22:05 -0800 (PST), Andy Dingley

Hey Andy,
I've got a couple of safe jobs in mind. You available?
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Upscale wrote:

With many older safes its easier to take the back off if you can access it
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wrote:

If you have a safe that old, it's probably worth more now than the contents. Those were iron (not steel) safes, made of plates held between L-angle corner frames. They could be attacked by "peeling", taking each of the several plates out one-by-one by levering them up from a corner, like a big tin opener.
The US defence against that was the "cannonball" safe. Spherical, cast in one piece, with no corners, no thin plates and a single skin layer that you had to attack all in one go (or usually fail to). Britain used better(sic - British hardened steel wasn't too good at first) flat steel plates in single thick plates. Later the safe began to be made by folding rather than joining and "round cornered" safes appeared. The sides, top and bottom were formed as one piece, with the join underneath, and were hard to attack from the sides. These still needed to have front and back inserted and so they were weaker than the sides. Some safe breakers were known to cut through a wall to get to the back, as still being the weakest route in.
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Only thing I have to do with safes these days is eBay thieves ripping off my images for selling their own combination locks 8-(
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He's living dangerously these days -- =not= in a 'safe' line of work, his vaulted expertise not withstanding. *GRIN*
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Nitroglycerine? A safe job, or a safe-job?
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"Andy Dingley" wrote:
<Snip Safe Cracking 101 by Andy Dingley>
Learn something new every day, or try to.
Lew
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1873: fence tool 1874: fence tool 1875: "galvanic" fence too, used to measnure the tension in the wires 1876: heckler 1877: ??? something to do with fences, pretty sure 1878: cone of silence
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wrote:

My guesses this week (and pretty much just guesses):
1873 - This looks like a watchmaker's fixture of some manner to me. Perhaps it's used to locate where holes should be placed in dials for the shafting that moves the hands?
1874 - Very strange looking lever; perhaps it is used to open a can or bottle of some kind (in Alaska)?
1875 - I'd guess this to be part of a searchlight or similar light fixture, perhaps using an arc light (for which the holders are adjustable). It would seem that there ought to be a reflector or lens attached.
1876 - Grate thingy clamped around a gas burner to support a pot, making a stove of sorts?
1877 - Would this be used by a telephone installer/lineman? If so, there are a few key pieces missing (like a soldering iron and wire cutters). The glass vial would presumably contains carbon granules for the transmitters.
1878 - Homemade looking parabolic microphone, used to record or monitor sounds directly underneath while rejecting sounds from other directions.
--
Andrew Erickson

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1874. This looks like a gauge to measure sheets of paper or card stock. 1875. The name Henry LePaute is associated with lighthouses. The device may be a gimbaled lighting device. The electrical contacts on the front could have held a lamp element. 1876. Perhaps something that attaches to a fence post to prevent animals from pushing against it.
Carl G.
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    Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1873)    My guess as to the function is to define/layout the spacing     of bearing points for gears in a clock or watch type object.     (This could include things like dial indicators and such as     well).
    Profession:    Watchmaker
1874)    Looks rather nasty. At a guess, it is for picking up something     like as stove lid.
1875)    Looks as though it was designed to orient prisms or jewels for     some purpose. Since it does not have visible angle scales, I'll     say that it was not likely used for things like X-ray     diffraction measurements.
    Hmm ... a (probably slow) electric motor to rotate the one part.
1876)    Another form of horse hobble? Looks as though it clips around     the ankle of something the size of a horse's leg.
1877)    Well ... several of the parts on the bottom center and right     assemble to make a breast drill. The bottle looks to contain     gunpowder (black powder). The top left thing looks like a torch     fueled by alcohol, gasoline, or something similar. Left just     above the bottom-most object looks like a fueled lamp of some     sort. Not any clue what the triple-cone thing is for, and not     enough detail about the can type thing near the bottom left to     tell. One of the drill bits looks more like a long wood screw.
1878)    Too thin to be a vacuum chamber, especially without a safety     cage around it. Wires coming in from the chain attachment point     nearest the point of view.
    At a guess -- for setting off mild explosions held between the     two strange blocks.
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Rob H. wrote:

1872 , watchmakers tool of some decription ,maybe for setting/measuring clock gear center distances or similar
--
Kevin (Bluey)
"I'm not young enough to know everything."
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