What is it? Set 326

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If a few of these persistent re-inventors had looked a bit further afield from the things we'd already solved, we'd have better mousetraps and steam-powered personal helicopters by now.
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Better mousetraps have been posted any number of times :-)
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The problem with socialism is there's always
someone with less ability and more need.
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------------------------------------ "Rob H." wrote:

Since it uses a basic over center mechanism, there are probably several applications for the device shown.
Just for grins, due a Google on "chain binders".
Lew
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No idea what the patent says, but the Peavey Manufacturing Company says uses were pulling stumps and raising dam gates.
http://www.peaveymfg.com/history.html
I just looked at one I have in my garage. No manufacturer's mark on the castings, so it may have been by another maker.
John Martin
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wrote:

I did a search on Peavey hoist when you first posted this answer but couldn't find a photo of one on the web. Here is the patent for the fence tightener:
http://www.google.com/patents/about?id 5OAAAAEBAJ&dq2845
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

1867 -
1868 - Looks like some type of clock since it has 12 steps.
1869 - OLD breast brace.
1870 -
1871 - Looks like a tire spreader to open a tire up so you can patch it. But it's probably something else.
1872 - Ratchet steps for either an awning or maybe a transom window.
--
Steve W.

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1867 - cannon ball holder / loader 1868 - Religious something? 1869 - Cutoff valve handle turner? 1870 - what those other guessers said 8>) 1871 - Another Fire hose apparatus? Does the gauge in the picture have any significance? 1872 - I like the guess as that it would hold a awning at different positions.
Mike in Ohio Rob H. wrote:

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The gauge has no significance, someone sent me this photo that they had shot in a restaurant, so the items are just random decorations.
Rob
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#1868: 12-hour Night clock. Light a new candle with known burning characteristics at 18:00 hours; by the time the candle has burned to a nub, it's 06:00 hours.
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wrote:

Bit late to the party this week, but here none the less. My guesses:
1867 - At first glance, I thought this may be a boat anchor, but closer examination shows this is very unlikely. The fine detailing is all wrong for an anchor, and the shape wouldn't be particularly practical should it fall with the wrong side down. Perhaps its an incense holder of some manner, possibly intended to be hung overhead?
1868 - Clock of some manner. I'd guess perhaps a form of water clock, where the cylinder is filled with water at the start of the day and slowly oozes out through the wicking. The pointer would be attached to a float that rides down on the water level. It wouldn't seem to me to be overly accurate unless the temperature and humidity were constant.
1869 - Heavy duty two-handed breast brace, presumably for drilling.
1870 - A very wild guess--a weight to keep a sash cord straight, maybe? I really have no idea.
1871 - Another very wild guess--the head of a tool to replace a tread on a tank or bulldozer when it gets dislodged somehow from its drivers?
1872 - Ratchety hold down thingy for something adjustable. I might suspect it's used with a swinging window or ventilator operated by a rope; a ring or similar on the rope would engage the teeth to permit various adjustments of the opening. (As an example, many sugar houses [where maple syrup is made] traditionally have swinging ventilators along a raised bit of the roof ridge, commonly operated by a rope and some pulleys.)
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Andrew Erickson

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always:
1867)    It sort of looks like something for scooping leaves and such     out of gutters. Plastic, not metal. Maybe it could be drawn     along the gutter by a cord.
1868)    A clock:
    It either works by evaporation from the wick, or the burning of     something like kerosene from the wick. At a guess, I would say     that evaporation would be too variable in speed -- dependent on     the humidity. The burning rate of the kerosene might also be     dependent on the amount of wick exposed.
    Anyway -- there is a float in the cylindrical reservoir, and     this supports the rod to point to the time, indicating the     remaining liquid in the cylinder.
1869)    A direct and personal application Roto-rooter for something     like a storm drain?
1870)    Hmm ... it is supported by the points between two conical holes     and is spun by a cord wrapped around either side of the central     ball?
    But I can't come up with a useful *reason* to do this.
1871)    A bottle opener -- including for large flat jar lids which     pry up?
    It looks to be bronze, which would suggest that it is designed     to avoid making sparks in the presence of flammable gas.
1872)    Mounts on the back or side of a fireplace, and is used to     adjust the height of a cooking vessel above the fire?
    Now to see what others have suggested.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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I think 1868 might be a candle clock. The candle in set on the pin and lit at 6:00 o'clock. As it burns down, the level of the remaining wax indicates the time.
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