What is it? Set 262

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Hi Rob, Is it a frog for arranging flowers? Not sure how the stems would fit into the center holes, though (the ones that are over a thin vertical section). Kerry
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Kerry Montgomery wrote:

Humidifier? Fill with water and set on heat source to add moisture to the air? This is the ceramic item with holes correct?
--
Steve W.

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The ceramic piece with the holes has been identified, it's an Asian ceramic pillow, someone checked at a Chinese establishment and was told that it was filled with herbs, the aromas of which induce sleep and/or restfulness.
I guess I'll go ahead and give the answer for the other one, it was used for filling 18 small cups at the same time:
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album10/imageCb.jpg
I used to have the patent for it but can't seem to locate it right now. I think the device was supposedly used at a church, I've heard of churches that served grape juice at their services though I've never been to one like that.
Rob
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Rob H. wrote:

Hmm didn't see that. That looks just like the old communion tray from my wifes former UMC church. Grape juice was used because it would be illegal (now) to use wine. That was what was originally used (and still is in Catholic churches) during communion. That funnel device was in the kitchen there.
--
Steve W.

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wrote:

Well, I hope somebody else can provide some help, as I'm fairly certain I cannot. These are my guesses, some far less educated than others.
1483 - The circular cutouts would seem to hold small bottles, and the squared sections could hold larger bottle or some sort of random implements. I'd guess that this may be for apothecary supplies, for one who might have need of compounding their own medications or have to serve as a doctor in some rather limited capacity. I'd assume a full-time druggist would have a wider selection of ingredients and require larger quantities than would fit in here.
1484 - A throwing knife
1485 - Tongs for, ummm...maybe holding e.g. a goat's horn while dehorning? It doesn't appear that the blades could possibly close together enough for crimping something.
1486 - Rotary shear, presumably for sheet metal, perhaps specialized to also put some sort of a folded edge on the metal for something like forming seams on roofing.
1487 - Shoe attachment for aerating lawns as one walks about doing chores. Probably very annoying to use, especially to one not accustomed to it.
1488 - Rather a strange implement. It may be used for some decorative application (wood graining, etc) by putting various brushes or scribers in selected holes. It does seem that if e.g. a brush with merely replaceable bristles was desired, there would be far simpler and less fiddly ways of achieving that than to have some many individually threaded holes.
Now to read the other ideas....
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Andrew Erickson

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1483: Jewelry box
1484: letter opener
1485: Barbed wire tongs
1486: Single-slice bread slicer
1487: Glacier-walking sole piece
1488: World's most overengineered squeegee handle.
--
It's times like these which make me glad my bank is Dial-a-Mattress

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    O.K. Posting from Rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
1483)    Hmm ... I *think* that there should be a balance in the     housing. It looks to me like something which would be used to     carry the ingredients and tools for making medications. Small     glass bottles in the racks on the side doors, and packets of dry     chemicals in the bottom square compartments, while the long ones     under the side racks are probably for mixing tools.
    If it were taller, and if the rack holders were a bit smaller, I     would suggest that it was for a microscope, with the racks to     hold spare eyepieces of differing strengths.
1484)    I think that is a balanced throwing knife -- perhaps as used     in theatrical productions.
1485)    Looks like a tool made by a blacksmith. Perhaps for holding     a hot piece as he works on it.
    I know that I don't want it holding any part of *me*. :-)
1486)    For cutting cloth to make ribbons of a constant width, I think.
1487)    For traction in very muddy soil? It looks as though it straps     on over the user's toe, and has a clamp in the back to hold the     heel in place.
1488)    I think that a series of pointed pieces screw in, but exactly     what it is to comb I don't know.
    Now to see what others have said.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1483 I would guess its a box for storing pipes and other pipe smoking articles. 1484 It looks like the kind of throwing knife that the entertainment people use. 1485 obviously some kind of gripper but couldn't guess its precise use. 1486 looks like a tin cutter (I used to make something similar but without the fence) I would say from the highly polished surfaces though that its probably for cutting leather or other material other than metal. 1487 snow grip for strapping onto your shoe. 1488 no idea
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Can you find out the spacing between holes? Are the marks in the center of the holes, or the center-to-center distance *between* the holes? Or offset from the center - just can't tell from the pictures. Also - what is the threading of the holes? Is this made from aluminum?
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Both the holes and lines are spaced at 1/4", in the photo below you can see that the lines are centered on the holes, in reference to the photo the owner says "seems like it's supposed to be held like this":
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v80/harnett65/Album10/pic1488d.jpg
I'm starting to back off of the carpet stretcher idea, if that were the case I don't think the lines would server any purpose. Others have suggested that the missing parts could have been markers for drawing lines on paper or a blackboard, there are sufficient spaces to make the lines any distance apart needed.
I'll ask the owner about the threading and what the tool is made from.
Rob
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    [ ... ]

    That may be -- and possibly you can remove inserts to make skips in the pattern.

    Umm ... where did you find non-conductive aluminum? At best, the very thin layer of oxide on the surface is non-conductive, until you get to a high enough voltage. And an anodized surface is also non-conductive -- again until you get to a high enough voltage. Past that, it conducts very well. I've had a 240 VAC difference break down the anodize coating on a chassis thanks to a mis-wiring.
    And remember -- aluminum house wiring was used for a period, until it started starting fires as the wiring aged. So yes, aluminum conducts quite well.
    For that matter -- the leads from the meter to the breaker box in this house are aluminum, so if it were non-conductive, I would not be able to run the computer on which I am typing this, and would be sitting here in the dark.

    Even a very thick anodize on aluminum would not protect against the voltages present in a thunderstorm. Forget that theory.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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Well, we can forget the non-conductive component (so it won't be for lightning protection on high rises), but not that a blade of some sort could be screwed on.
--riverman
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The writing on the handle (which I'm embarrassed to admit I hadn't noticed until now) says "McBee Patent Pending".
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OK I've got it.
It is a handle for sorting punched cards http://www.google.com/patents?id=hfdMAAAAEBAJ&dq=mcbee+handle
It is supposed to have several rods that poke out of the threaded holes. You put the rods that match the alignment of the mounting holes for your card set (cards like old business forms with mounting holes for a binder). Then you can manually sort them and stack them on the rods.
Paul K. Dickman

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Thanks! That would have been very difficult to guess.
Rob
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    Bingo! Except that the cards have holes all the way along one or more edges, and to encode something, a notch is punched from the hole to the edge. To select everything which matches something (e.g. an expiration date in month and year, you have one month out of twelve punched, and one of ten holes for the last digit of the year (and perhaps one of two or three for near decades). Then, to find those which expire in that year and month, you line up all the cards, run the rods into the holes corresponding to the month and year, then lift and shake. Those which match will fall free, while the rest will be attached by at least one rod.
    I used a similar system (without the fancy handle, just using knitting needles for the sort) to handle the membership files of an organization to which I belonged -- until I wrote computer programs to handle it much more quickly. (Especially getting things sorted back into alphabetic order after several extractions and updates. I forget who sold the system (it was quite affordable), but it worked amazingly well. And I would have liked to have the handle shown with the rods (assuming that the spacing was right for the pre-punched cards. :-)
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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1488: For making grooves in concrete?
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nah... not plaster, either <G>
LLoyd
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