What is it? Set 232

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A new set has been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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1301 Lantern
1302 Belaying pins
1304 Crystal radio sets. (Primitive televisions without pictures)
1305 Diffraction grating
1306 Upholstering tool

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I think these might actually be the pins used in link and pin couplers in the early days of railroading. I thought belaying pins were generally made of wood?
                            ---john.
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John Haskey wrote:

http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,26866.html http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,27539.html http://store.hamiltonmarine.com/browse.cfm/4,26876.html
--
--
--John
  Click to see the full signature.
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J. Clarke wrote:

Man, they're proud of those things, aren't they? Makes Bessey's look pretty cheap.
--
If you're going to be dumb, you better be tough

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wrote:

http://cprr.org/Museum/Ephemera/Link-Pin_Couplers.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Belaying_pin
I'd argue that the shapes favor belaying pins, and the wikipedia cite (and others) say wood or metal.
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I'm still a bit dubious about the tool being for cement work. I've done my fair share of cement work and I've never seen a rolling groover. I couldn't find a rolling groover anywhere on the internet. I've seen plenty of rolling joint rakers, but never a groover (two sided) nor edger (on sided). Besides the obvious cleaning issue with the tool you posted, there's the very problematic question of how the tool would function. The typical groovers are like sleds with curved leading and trailing ends, and they have flat bottoms so there's little worry about creating unevenness. Since concrete has aggregate and is not a uniform material a rolling groover would create a divot or hump every time it ran into an obstruction (aggregate) or soft spot. You would have a lot of unhappy customers if you finished off the nice flat work with wavy grooves/edges. Here's a link to Marshalltown's groovers: http://www.marshalltown.com/catalog/results.asp?SUBCAT !1 The designs are all the same, flat bottom and you push it back and forth. I can't imagine any trade is slower to change than concrete finishing - it's been the same material worked with essentially the same tools for thousands of years. I also did a USPTO search and drew a blank for a rolling groover. The tool looks like it has a marking on the wishbone part of the handle. Do you have more information on that? Thanks.
R
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RicodJour wrote:

Make that 250 years (the art was lost after the roman times see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concrete#Roman_invention )
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I've seen a number of other tools that do their intended job but have design flaws of one type or another, and I think that is the case with this particular tool. As I stated before, this exact tool is in one of my books, and though I couldn't find a photo on the web, there was this mention of it:
"Joints in the pervious concrete pavement were cut immediately after rolling using a rolling groover ..."
From this site:
http://www.infolink.com.au/n/Look-Ma-No-Runoff-n758579

I haven't worked much with cement but if this tool is as bad as you say it is then it would make sense that you haven't seen one, they probably made them for a year or two and then quit production.

Same here.

In the photo it does look like a mark of some sort, but it's just pitting; there's not a single number, letter, or symbol on it.
So since I have some evidence that it is a rolling jointer and no evidence pointing in any other direction, I'm going to have to keep my current answer for now. If anyone finds additional information on this tool one way or the other, please let me know, I'd be happy to take a look at it.
Rob
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wrote:

highly specialized and unusual concrete application. This special concrete would only work in frost free areas. Gerry :-)} London, Canada
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Remember that Japanese fish hook that is pretty much identical to a lumberman's pick? Maybe it's one of those things. Developed for one use, turns out it sucks for that application, then someone fishing around for a tool for another unrelated task picks it up and goes, "Aha!" I'd sharpen it up and use it to cut pizza just to freak people out.

The fly in the ointment with that link is that it refers to pervious pavement/concrete. That's a relatively new development and the tool looks to be at least 50 years old judging from the patina.

True enough. My eyes automatically shun shoddy tools. ;)

Fair enough. Thanks for the reply.
R
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True, and most dedicated craftsmen don't buy tools that make their job _more_ work.
R
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and again some silly guesses from germany...
1302 "Beschlagsngel" (oops, word is missing) used on large sailing ships
1304 adjustable transformer or inductor, used for laboratory or school
the others no idea
greetings from germany chris
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1303 Tool to remove roofing.
1306 Cement grooving tool?
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1301- explosion proof oil lamp
1302- holds a rope wrapped around it when you insert it into a hole
1303- strips shingled roofs and pulls the nails at the same time
1304- crystal radios
1305
1306- decorative groover for?
Dave
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R.H. wrote:

/mark
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1301. Safety lantern for use in flamable/explosive atmospheres. AKA a "Davy" lamp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davy_lamp).
1302. Belaying pins. Used to tie off or "belay" ropes on a sailing vessel.
1303. Manual weed eater used to cut weeds off that are growing in a parking lot. Looks like it has to be used horizontally rather than vertically.
1304. Tuning coil and "cat's whisker" signal detection/tuning portion of old "crystal" AM radio set. Making one of these work could sometimes be a black art in low signal "fringe" areas.
1305. Looks like it might be a monochromater from a spectrometer (a device that splits incoming light into its component wavelengths)
1306. Used for rolling expansion joints in concrete.
.
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HI,     As several others have noted, #1305 is a diffraction grating. It is mounted in a precision rotating mount. Note the two screws on the back to set the vertical and horizontal tilt. The "ball" is probably the mechanical contact with the "sine bar" ( not shown) which causes the grating to rotate in a very controlled fashion. This drives rotation mount such the sine of its angle of rotation changes linearly with the angle of the input which is often a from a stepper motor.
    Diffraction gratings are often on removable mounts so different gratings can be swapped in and out of the spectrometer. On the bottom is a kinematic mount for so that the assembly can be replaced back to its exact previous position.
Thanks Roger Haar
R.H. wrote:

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To get technical for a moment, I don't think this is a diffraction grating. I rather suspect it is a prism. This was probably used in a UV-Visible spectrophotometer.
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The owner sent a few more photos to me that have been posted on the site, including a side view and a shot of the red glass ball:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Below is his description of where he got it:
"I purchased a "miscellaneous lot" of items in a plastic dairy crate at an auction, kind of a grab bag assortment. In it were various hand tools, some aircraft parts, (two old dashboard compasses), and this item, which was inside one of those little felt bags that Crown Royal whiskey comes in."
I've been doing some research based on the guesses listed in this thread but haven't had any luck so far.
Rob
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