What is it? CLXX

A new set has just been posted:
http://puzzlephotos.blogspot.com /
Rob
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987. Very small swage block?
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984. carriage brakes 985. shingle splitter 988. dipstick
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986--It closes on a steel surveyor's tape, so the correct tension can be applied. 988--Seems like it must be for gauging liquids. "BARL" could stand for barrel, but I would have expected "BBL."
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"R.H." wrote: Several different people told me that it was for pulling long tape measures, but most likely it was also used for surveyor's tape. (clip) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Surveyors stretch their tape horizontally for measuring. The ground is generally not level, so one end of the tape has to be held above the ground, and the tape sags a little. The amound to sag is controlled by pulling the tape to the correct tension--the "brass knuckles" gripper tool is used to apply the tension. We did this in my college surveying class about 60 years ago. (You drop a plumb bob from the raised end to get a reading.) By now it is probably all digitized.
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I worked on a survey crew about 30 years ago and we used a laser transit then. No tapes.
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Gopher mallet.
Book binding tool.
Eric Bloodaxe's baby toy.
Fold-up brass knuckles.
Patent universal ashtray.
Measuring stick for beer.
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983. Hammer for posting notices overhead. Lower brass(?) clip holds the bottom of the poster, upper clip holds the tack & top of the poster.
Art

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    Posting from rec.crafts.metalworking as always.
    An interesting (and puzzling) set.
983)    An interesting variety of long-handled hammer, apparently     designed for reaching up high overhead and starting a tack or     broad-headed nail (perhaps a shingling nail?) using the spring     clip on the side, and then rotating the hammer head to use it     normally for driving in fully. I expect that it would be a bit     of a job to control accurately that far from your hands.
    Given the second clip about six inches below the nail clip, it     could have been used to start hanging a notice "bill" already     started on the nail in the clip and with the bottom edge held by     the clip until the hammer is eased down off of it. Perhaps even     for enameled metal advertising signs, such as those which     advertised sodas.
984)    The base holds onto something round like a log, while the jaws     close to hold something thin upright with a rope passing around     the log and affixed to the two arms. Perhaps for a red     clearance flag when towing or carrying something longer than the     vehicle?
985)    Perhaps for removing bark from logs?
986)    The round ends are on eccentric pins, so when the two "scissors     handles" are brought together, they grip something between the     two round ends. If they are fairly new, then I would suspect     lead, and they serve as a clip-on weight for some purpose.     Otherwise, I would think cad or zinc plated steel, and for     fixturing something as you work on it.
987)    This seems to be missing a matching top half. But it looks as     though its function is to crimp sleeves onto cables by laying     them in the grooves (cable in the round bottomed side, sleeve in     the V-bottomed side, and striking the upper half with a heavy     hammer (probably with the whole thing resting on an anvil).
988)    Depth gauge of some sort -- and double ended, so probably for     measuring two different things. One end could be for measuring     the depth of fuel in the fuel tank of a vehicle, while the other     end would be for measuring the cooling water in the radiator.     Both depths are relative to the metal flange sticking out at     about the 2/3 point along the length.
    And the differing scales are perhaps to handle the liquids at     different temperatures.
    Or -- it could be for measuring depth of beans or grain with the     differing scales showing the weight of a given depth for the     different types of product.
    Now -- to see what others have guessed.
    Enjoy,         DoN.
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oops, im comming late this week ...
988 maybee i am wrong, but i think i can remember my grandma had some similar thing and that she used it for tailoring and measuring her skirts.
986 i would guess the same as don, the two "scissors handles" seem to be eccentric, clip on weight, to squeeze, or to make something thinner.
greetings from germany chris
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