What happened to lumber imports?

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I used to be able to get all kinds of wonderful Argentinian hardwoods at a local supplier at very reasonable prices. Now he doesn't have _any_. Woodworkerssource.com used to have a tremendous selection, now they don't even have samples of most of the species they list. I'm having to look long and hard and am finding onesey-twosey turning squares and not great stacks of rough-sawn lumber like I was used to.
Anybody know what has happened? Did some new regulations go into effect? Has the US somehow managed to piss off the international lumber market?
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It may depend on where you live. Near us is Exotic Lumber. They have outlets in Gaithersburg, MD and Annapolis, MD., And offer a wide range of wood - both imported and domestic. I'm sure there are other sources out there.
Joel
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On 8/12/2010 7:59 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

They've got a bit but none of the big rain forest osage orange boards and lapacho and quina and so on that I was used to.
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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 09:41:29 -0400, "J. Clarke"

The rainforest has been harvested - and many countries are putting cutting restrictions in place.
Those that aren't should be.
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On Aug 12, 1:16 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Hear hear!
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J. Clarke wrote:

Rain forest Osage orange? The only Osage orange (aka "hedge apple") I have ever seen growing naturally was in NE Texas, SW Oklahoma and a smidge in eastern Kansas.
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On 08/12/2010 01:46 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Not uncommon in the Osage Mountains of southern Missouri and northern Arkansas either (hooda thunk?). We had some growing near our rural home a few miles east of the Missouri River bottoms between Jefferson City and Columbia, which is pretty far north of where it's normally found.
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On 8/12/2010 3:06 PM, Steve Turner wrote:

Apparently in South America it grows to be a big tree. They used to have 8/4 12 feet long.

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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 16:13:32 -0400, J. Clarke wrote:

The stuff from S.A. is a different species, but the same genus. It's called Argentine Osage Orange, Yes it is larger and the claim is made that the color doesn't go away like it does in the native stuff. I don't know if that's true or not. See:
<http://www.amazonexotichardwoods.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=TB-AOO>
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<<...snipped...>>
Not too common but I have seen them growing at a few places in central Md, too. Some sources I have read say they are native to SE USA but I don't know if that includes Md. or these were intentionally planted here. BTW, their commonly called "poke apple" around here.
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On 8/12/2010 6:09 PM, Larry W wrote:

When I lived in Missouri back in the seventies we called 'em "hedge apples". Not sure why...
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Steve Turner wrote:

...
They're quite widespread in eastern KS (or at least were unless they've been systematically removed...
There "hedge apples" owing to they were often planted along field borders and developed into dense growth, hence hedges. The apple portion should be self-evident...
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The trees if allowed to grow that way - we had an 'orchard' next door to us - have thorns. Often in the wild and underbrush areas it makes a low tree/bush. With the thorns, not much wants to go through.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 8/12/2010 10:42 PM, dpb wrote:

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wrote:

In rural western NJ, the farmers of old planted them in rows to make a natural fence. Some old farms had a row of them where the property met the road. Around the bases there's always so much scrub brush and sticks growing, that if they are planted close together it make an effective barrier like a fence or hedge.
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We had them along the farm borders in central Illinois, too. I was told they were put there for erosion control after the dust-bowl of the '30s.
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Decades ago, I knew a guy in Glen Burnie who had 2000 BF of Osage orange to sell. Where he got it, I don't know. I ran a couple of sample planks through my thickness planer and completely buggered my blades. It was like running limestone through. I was told that Osage orange was used for cleats on a boat.
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I got an 18" length - 4" - from my dad - limb...
I turned it on my metal lathe - and now for over 10 years it is coming to dry and is ready for the next step. Now just what.
Beautiful yellow gold colors.
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 8/13/2010 7:39 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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On Thu, 12 Aug 2010 14:06:26 -0500, Steve Turner wrote:

Also grew in Kentucky.
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wrote:

Pretty common in NE Oklahoma where I grew up.
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On 8/12/2010 1:46 PM, dadiOH wrote:

Bois d'Arc ... or horse apples.
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