What Hand Plane to Use

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I am building a workbench and intend to flatten the top by hand. I have a Stanley #5. Will that get the job done (seems like a pretty long plane) or would it be worth it to hustle over to Ebay and start bidding on a #6 or #7??
Thanks for the advice. Woodpecker
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the longer the better, though I have read where people use a smoothing plane which is shorter than the #5
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http://users.adelphia.net/~kyhighland


"Woodpecker" < snipped-for-privacy@myway.com> wrote in message
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As someone said sometime ago: If viewed in the spatial frequency domain planing is a low pass operation with the cut-off frequency being the inverse of the plane length (times some factor). In other words: With a short plane you leave all "waves" with a wavelength longer than (twice) the plane length in, because th plane will follow those wafes rather than smooth them out.
[...]

Why not use tha famous pattern lathe? If it's such a universal hypertool you could make workbenches by the dozen without having to lift a finger.
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[...]

... sorry, probably wrong Woodpecker...
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Dr. Juergen Hannappel http://lisa2.physik.uni-bonn.de/~hannappe
mailto: snipped-for-privacy@physik.uni-bonn.de Phone: +49 228 73 2447 FAX ... 7869
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Yep. No connection.

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Another option is to see if you have a cabinet shop around and see what they would charge you to run through their large sander.
Alan
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    Greetings and Salutations...
On 18 Jan 2004 14:47:53 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (Alan W) wrote:

less. While I like using a good plane as well as the next Neander, THis is one of those times when it makes a lot of sense to me to let the machines do it.     Unless...of course...one's hobby is hand-planing a bench. In that case, have at it.     As for the length of the plane...Got to remember that the LONGER the plane the flatter a surface one will get.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@worldnet.att.net (Alan W) wrote:

Just a word of warning. I did that this weekend. My workbench is made from Southern Yellow Pine and a few of the boards were a bit sappy. This clogged the sanding drum and made my buddy a bit unhappy :) We changed the paper aftwerwards, it wouldn't clean up.
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wrote in message

This is pretty good advice, but you should take into consideration that this is likely to leave sanding grit embedded in your top, which is something you may not want. Among other potential problems, if you ever wanted to tune the top up with a plane in the future, that grit wouldn't be good for the sole or the edge of the iron.
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On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 14:57:14 -0500, "Woodpecker"

Yes. No-one wants #6s, so they're pretty cheap and a #7 is useful for when you finally want a long jointer.
If you've made the top before it arrives, use the #5 anyway.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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wrote:

My No. 6 gets more use than almost any plane I have. Patrick Leach gives them a bad rap on his Web site but I find mine very useful. Paid $15 for it in Mount Dora, Florida.
Dick Durbin
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On 18 Jan 2004 18:19:30 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@tfn.net (Dick Durbin) wrote:

Mine doesn't, but it gets more use than my #7. I often joint short things, rarely a long tabletop though. And I can't lift the #8, so I barely use it.
-- Information wants to be free. Data fancies being tied up and spanked by Troi.
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On 18 Jan 2004 18:19:30 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@tfn.net (Dick Durbin) brought forth from the murky depths:

Do you use it for curls, or woodworking, Dick? ;) ^^^^^ My $15 #60-1/2 (with Hock blade installed + the orig iron) is my most-used plane, followed by the Knight smoother.
- Every day above ground is a Good Day(tm). ----------- http://diversify.com Website Application Programming
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Iron I won off Ebay 2 weeks ago. I was surprised at how usefull a even newer junk low angle (20) block plan was with a sharp iron. It did not cause tearout on the purpleheart I was working on like the #4 and #5 did.
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On 20 Jan 2004 04:18:51 -0800, snipped-for-privacy@tfn.net (Dick Durbin) brought forth from the murky depths:

Ditto here, but it's not working as well as I'd hoped. I'm still a good 20lbs overweight.

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Larry Jaques wrote:

Harkens back to my old Roya1 days. I read that as "201" pounds, and was thinking Monsewer Jock-kwez cou1d do with fewer ho hos.
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On Tue, 20 Jan 2004 16:59:39 -0500, Silvan

That's "Jake's" to you, bubba. And when Tom called, he asked for "C-less" (out of the blue and with that confounded Eastern accent) so I told him he had a wrong number and _almost_ hung up on him. I thought it was some idjut wanting a boat shop or sumpin'. 'Sea' what?
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snipped-for-privacy@tfn.net (Dick Durbin) wrote in message wrote:

Regardless of utility, they do seem to be priced pretty low relative to #7s.

Case and point. :-)
Cheers, Mike
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Woodpecker wrote:

#8, #7, #6, #5, #4, in that order... :)
I flattened mine with a #4 because it was the only plane I had. It's probably not dead flat, but it's close enough.
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Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
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the #7 sounds good, but a thicknessing sander sounds better.
$1 a minute at my lumber supplier. I rarely spend more than $5 at any one time. Get it close when you glue up, use the sander to clean it up.
On Sun, 18 Jan 2004 14:57:14 -0500, "Woodpecker"

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