What finish


I am building the dresser top from Wood Magazine. I modified the wood types and went with some Beech I had lying around and used Baltic birch for the panel and drawer bottom. What finish should I use? I would like to finish it with something that will stand up to some abuse (due to the type of project it is), but I don't want it to look like plastic. Any suggestions?
Thanks
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Highspeed wrote:

What type of abuse? Water?
When I want durable I use Danish oil with three coats of polyurathane. But it does have a little plastic look..don't know any other way.
A compromise may be Waterlux Original.

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On 9 Oct 2005 03:16:56 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "Never

Waterlox (note the spelling, please) is NO compromise, ever.
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Larry Jaques wrote:

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I've not used Waterlox... what's the advantages? I've used Varathane waterbased floor finish on furniture with good success.

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Sorry, let me clarify, it is a dresser top VALET not a dresser top. It will take abuse of keys, glasses, and other things on it top. You can get a picture here http://us.st8.yimg.com/store1.yimg.com/I/woodstore_1861_20403889 I hope this helps. The Mahogany portion in the photo are now beech and vinyl panel is birch. Any other suggestions?
Thanks again,
Lars
NorthIdahoWWer wrote:

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Highspeed wrote:

Use oil. On the vulnerable parts at least.
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On Sun, 9 Oct 2005 11:16:47 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm,
I wrote:

No plastic look to it, excellent popping of the grain, easy to rub on, easy to repair if damaged (though it's tough), doesn't flake like poly, etc.
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Waterlox is a compromise between the water resistent capabilities of polyurathane and the natural look of oil.
I like Waterlox, soo rry you took offense.
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On 10 Oct 2005 03:15:49 -0700, with neither quill nor qualm, "Never

I disagree. The combination of tung oil and varnish appears to be just as water resistant as poly.

No biggie. I'm just a bit defensive over my favorite finish, especially when the comparison is with polyurinestain. :)
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I'm sure you'll get a bunch of replies to this post, no two of which will recommend the same thing. Here is my two cents:
Daly's ProFin is the best finishing product that God ever let Man invent. Period. It's easy to apply, dries very hard, stands up to years of abuse, and is easily "doctored' if scratched. The product comes in two finish types, gloss and satin. With practice, one can work with the gloss product to dull it down to any reflectivity desired, but I tend to use the satin product. The key to success with ProFin is to use lots of thin coats - don't get impatient and slather it on. Most woods require about four applications before the entire surface retains the finish (i.e., before all parts of the surface stop absorbing the finish). If you don't like how a particular coat came out, you just sand it down a bit and keep going.
ProFin can be tinted to achieve a wide variety of hues. I usually use it straight out of the can.
With time, woods stained with ProFin will acquire an amber cast (regardless of whether the surface is exposed to sunlight). Some people don't like this; I love it as it makes the wood look very warm.
Features such as figuring in Maple or birdseye features just light up beautifully when finished with ProFin.
Daly's makes another product - Benite - that I use as a precursor to ProFin.
Daly's sells their products by mail. You can check out the entire Daly's line at:
http://www.dalyspaint.com
...and no, I have no financial interest in Daly's. I'm just a 20-year satisfied customer, and fortunate enough to live near where they make the stuff.
Mark Proulx Des Moines, WA

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Good post, MArk. While we're on the topic of recommendations, you might consider Osmo Hardwax Oil -- http://www.environmentalhomecenter.com/shop.mv?CatCode=PRODUCT&ProdCode=OS_HARDWAX_OIL
Mark Proulx wrote:

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Thanks, I think I will try Waterlox for this one. Although the Osmo Hardwax Oil looks very interesting, I am going to investigate that further.
Thanks to all who replied.
Lars
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