Wax over Tung

Seeking advice regarding applying another finish over tung. The subjects are hardwood plates that will come into contact with food. Thanks for your help. an old curmudgeon
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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 05:44:23 GMT, A Curmudgeon

I'd leave it as is, just re-oil regularly. So long as it's not a lead-dried oil (which modern oils aren't) then it's plenty safe.
If you put wax over, you'll get white clouding whenever you try to wash it. For a fruitbowl or similar, this might be OK - just wipe it.
If you really want to seal it, use shellac.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 10:39:02 +0000, Andy Dingley

Thanks Andy. This is the first time using Formsby's tung oil so I didn't know how it acts. I'm trying to reduce the oily odor as it doesn't go well with tuna fush sandwiches. Thanks, Brian
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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 13:57:02 GMT, A Curmudgeon

Then I wouldn't use pure tung (if it isn't already finished). Either use a commercial blend of finishing oil (tung oil + thinners + driers) or use mineral oil.
Commercial oils are thinner than tung, quicker drying, easier to apply, and much easier to apply as an initial coat on dry wood. They also have a far less persistent smell. Tung oil does lose this, but it's not quick. Keeping it warm and dry will help, not leaving it in the workshop overnight.
Mineral oil is a non-drying oil that's good for chopping boards and salad bowls. You will need to re-apply it regularly, because washing will remove it.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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On Wed, 05 Nov 2003 18:21:29 +0000, Andy Dingley

Thanks Andy. The first 2 were already pretty much completed and they came out so nice with the tung. The remaining 6 plates will get done using both methods mentioned (first time with either of those methods so it should be interesting.) Again, thanks. Brian
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A Curmudgeon wrote:

I just want to make sure you are aware that Formsby's "Tung Oil Finish" is actually a wiping varnish. See the article written by Bob Flexner at:
http://www.popularwoodworking.com/features/finish2.html :
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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wrote:

Thanks Jack, always appreciate knowledgeable advice and the chance to learn. That would also explain why it has been curing overnight and not the days-to-weeks that I'd read elsewhere. Brian
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What exactly do you mean by food, apples, oranges, bananas, beef stew?
Then, what is the question, is it safe, can it go over tung oil, will it protect?
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 08:02:15 -0500, "Mike G"

Thanks for the response Mike, the reason for asking was more aesthetic than for protection. The tung has left a definite oil/spirit-type odor which I imagine might detract from the palate. They are plates; sandwich, cheese, etc. - no loose liquids. I understand that tung by itself is pretty well protected - it was just to reduce the oily odor. If tung loses it's odor over time then there is no problem and I won't attack it anymore. Thanks again, Brian
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Hi Brian
Oils are slow to cure but you can help it along by putting the plates in a warm area with a good air flow. It's winter or almost. Got a heat register that isn't somewhere where the odor will bother people. Not right on the register of course, got to let the air cool a bit.
Failing that you can try wax, it won't hurt. If that doesn't work remove the wax and try a light coat of shellac. Neither will last long and/or are easy to remove and they may solve you odor problem long enough to let the oil fully cure.
Good luck Mike
--
Mike G.
Heirloom Woods
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On Wed, 5 Nov 2003 21:06:54 -0500, "Mike G"

not a problem... but I understand - thanks. The first 2 plates came out nice so I'll try the wax on them. Thanks, Brian

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