Water-based poly?

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snipped-for-privacy@xxxfrii.com says...

You would have been better off filling the with a filler or several coats of thinned and sanded back coats of your finish. Now you don't have much choice but to plow forward adding coats.
The only real way you are going to accomplish the task without adding three, four, five, or six more coats is to sand what you have now all the way down to where it is flat, note, not to the wood, just so it is level, and add another coat or two on the sanded flat surface.
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MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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Yeah, I realize that now. The "texture" of the grain doesn't bother me as long as the wood is protected and the grain doesn't collect too much spilled milk and other gunk.

Can't. It's quarter-sawn oak with a very "open" grain. Some of the "pits" in the grain are lower than the surface of the wood.
I dunno if another 3 or more coats will actually "fill in" the grain, but maybe it will help?
I'm more concerned about the durability of the water-based. Unless it hardens as it cures, this will never work out. I can easily dent/scratch it with a fingernail.
I don't suppose it's possible to put solvent-based poly on top of water-based poly? :-(
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@xxxfrii.com says...

Hi Gary
Of course the pits are lower then the wood, that's oaks job.
Lets look at it this way. Suppose you dug a six foot hole in your back yard and the powers that be didn't like it and told you to get rid of it.
Now, you decide to get rid of it by, rather then just filling it in, putting layers of fill over the whole back yard. Yes, I know, of course you wouldn't actually do that but bear with me.
Ok, after about the fifteenth load of fill when half the back door is covered you find the hole is filling up. You've only got three more feet to fill. Kind of like where you are now.
So, where do you go from there. You scrape off all the layers down the three feet and the yard is level. Not all the way back to the original level, just till you reach the level the hole is filled too.
If you have multiple layers of finish on now you should be able to "scrape" that back to a level where all is flat and without hitting the wood. If you're not comfortable with that do a couple of more layers then sand it back. Do not expect large pores to be filled anytime soon by just adding more coats.
As for the strength of the poly. It'll take weeks before it cures fully, oil takes even longer. It'll help if you give each coat twice as long to cure as recommended before adding the next. Also, depending where you live of course, environmental factors can effect curing time. 50 degrees, which it is here right now, is not the ideal temperature for finishes. Finishes like about seventy.
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MikeG
Heirloom Woods
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OK, you had me wondering there. :-) So you're saying just smooth out the finish and don't worry about the pits in the open grain.

I didn't give it all that much extra time, but I did it in the basement to avoid 50deg temps. It was right around 70.
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@xxxfrii.com says...

No Gary, what I am saying is that if you continue to just add varnish in and attempt to level the low spots you could be at it for the next month.
Level out the finish to the level of the low spots caused by the open grain then add a coat or two.
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The Flecto WB Varathane label states "Our hardest finish".

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