Was: Suggestion for Pulling 4x4 wooden fence post.

Slighly off-topic for a wood working newsgruop . but, hey, there was a previous thread on the same subject in this group...
.. and the previous postings were a real help to me. I bought a "high jack" from NAPA Auto Parts (aka Farm jack) and followed the advice on the postings with a minor exception. Many of the postings advised using a chain. I found that if I used my circular saw to notch out a hold on the post, I could jack the post out without the chain. In the few tough cases, I did use a chain and put it into the notch for easy gripping. Like seveal of the postings also advised, a 2x4 under the jack prevents the jack from sinking down to bedrock....
Just though my "notching" idea might help somebody...or maybe I'm arrogant .. or both....or neither...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Would you still have notched the posts if you were planning on reusing them ? Not critizing - legit question.
Bob S.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sun, Jun 27, 2004, 11:18pm (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com (Bob) queries: Would you still have notched the posts if you were planning on reusing them ? Not critizing - legit question.
Hell, I probably wouldn't have bothered pulling the posts, unless I was planning on reusing them as posts. I'd probably just run over them with a truck, break 'em off at ground level. No prob.
JOAT That the peope have a right to bear arms for the defense of themselves and the state. - Pennsylvania Constitution of 1776
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Pulling the post depends on what is to follow.
I had a neighbor try to pull some wood 4x4 posts which must have had 2 bags of concrete mix per hole. He wanted to replace the fence with a brick retaining wall. Borrowed my pair of farm jacks - all it did was break the posts off at ground level.
I recommended that he break them all off at ground level and rent an electric jackhammer to break the base up if he really needed the concrete removed.
If the replacement fence can offset the posts from the originals, then breakoff is the fastest. To replace just ONE post in the line may require removing everything.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

In a similar situation, I just dug down to the concrete (about 6" below surface) and cut the posts off with the sawzall. Filled in the holes and forgot about the concrete.
-drl
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No such luck. The concrete was at the surface around each post, 16" diameter. This fence was adjacent to an alley paved in concrete. Probably used a concrete truck with a few yards left over to fill these holes. Great for the first owner, but difficult to remove.
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 30 Jun 2004 07:55:33 -0500, Thomas Kendrick
hire a backhoe
Have a party
Charge for a go on the BH <G>
Seriously. I have had guys line up to use a jackhammer like crows at a ....nuff sed.
You just got to pick the right office workers, and the right brand of ale! <G>

See? They thought it out <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.