Warped wood

Oak, 4' x 11" x 1"full is warped so that there is 1/4" lift in one corner.
What's the best way to unwarp please? I'd like to take out some tension before clamping/glue/screw. It's to be a simple bench (seat) top.
Thanks.
Dan.
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Bandsaw it into several narrow strips; joint and plane them straight, flat and square; then edge-glue them back together. This will reduce the thickness and the width of the panel. If you don't have enough wood to accomodate that, then you need either a larger board, or a flatter one. Or more narrow ones.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 16:47:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:
Thanks for the prompt reply. However, that would defeat the purpose ofa nice looking top. isuppose I'll use that board for smaller projects and start from scratch with the top. I was hoping for something like remedies in "The furniture doctor."
Dan.

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What kind of wood and from where? Chances are, another board will do the same thing unless you get in screwed into place immediately. This is a common happening with wood bought from the local Home Depot. All wood moves, but the wide boards are some of the worst.
A 1/4" is not much at all and perhaps can be brought into place with a couple of clamps and some screws and glue.
As for cutting into strips, that does not necessarily detract from the appearance. Take a look at your dining room table, You can be pretty sure it was not made from a single board. Ed
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wrote:

Thanks, but I did mention oak. It's from the mill, but has been lying around (flat) for a while, but not stickered.

I'll take your word on that. I had expected to do the same, but hoped it could be reduced a bit first without lying it on the lawn for a day or two [Furniture doctor].

11" would be a strip, I thought.
Thanks again. I'll just see if I can wet it down and get some swelling and twist as it dries. I just don't want to clamp it and then have the strain pull it apart later, as happened once with a table top.
Ok now, I'll just plough ahead as if I knew what I was doing.
Dan.
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Don't "wet" it. You'll open yourself for water stains you'll never get out.
I can hardly imagine a bench application where I couldn't work 1/4" in 4' out in the design. You'll be screwing it to some sort of rail. won't you?

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I aim to not raise a whole issue out of this, and DO appreciate the help.
I was hoping to screw material down into to the leg/trestle frame, then up into the seat. Tough when it's warped. I'll go for the glue/clamp/screwdown, and hide the screws with pegs.
Dan.
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Use pegs (endgrain showing) when you want to see it, plugs (side-grain showing) when you don't.
If you don't want the "pegs" to show, cut plugs with a tapered (yes you have to use the tapered kind to get a goot fit) plug. Plugs cutters of this sort are available from woodworking stores for <$15. Take care to cut your plugs from matching stock. With a little care you can have a nearly invisible patch. Trim flush with a chisel cutting *across* the grain. Chiseling *with* the grain can give you tearout if the grain dips into the surface.
-Steve
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On Wed, 28 Apr 2004 09:10:56 -0400, "Stephen M"

Thanks.
Dan.
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"Danny Boy" wrote in message

Without 'big iron', or a lot of planing, and particularly if there is an overhang on your bench, which there usually is, you might just want to mount it with figure 8 table top fasteners and see if that will hold it down, mitigate the warp, and still give you some wood movement wiggle room.
You didn't mention the latter, but with an 11" wide board, you are looking at possible expansion and contraction, more or less depending upon the type of cut, so be careful how you "clamping/glue/screw"
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 4/13/04
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Commonly called twist and the best way to cure a twisted board and still have a useful piece of stock left is to cut the stock into smaller piece so the overall twist in the shorter lengths require less stock to be removed to get a straight board.
Of course this isn't practical for the use you have planed for the stock so I'd suggest several nice oak jewelry boxes and a new board for your bench.
However, there may be circumstances, such as improper or insufficient stock acclimation, that would cause such a problem and if treated properly the board may straighten out all by it's onsies.
Sorry, best I can do for you.
--
Mike G.
snipped-for-privacy@heirloom-woods.net
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On Tue, 27 Apr 2004 22:29:42 -0400, "Mike G"

Thanks. I'll consider that option as well.
Many thanks to all contributors. Much appreciated, but that will do. my decision now.
Dan.
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