wall niches


does anyone have any ideas on how to build or ideas for recessed wall niches or curved tops for recessed shelves,wood, not plastic(they cost a fortune for what you get)nor drywall or plaster,,I am in a very limited resale market and freight is outrageous to get anything shipped here,thanks
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
andy wrote:

You'll have to segment the wood or steam bend it to get that tight curve. I've been playing with curved architecture for a while now. I've cut kerfs in the back of plywood to get it to bend, but it's still not going to bend very tightly. I laminated the plywood and it looks really good over the bar in my house. I cut the wall out and put an arch over it. I'll post picture of it some time when I can see it, maybe after I get my taxes done this year. You can't see the bar for all of the paper on it now.
Another idea, I saw Norm building a chest a while back. He curved the top by putting it together in strips and planing it and sanding until he got the curve he wanted.
Tom in KY
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
andy wrote:

By "curved top" do you mean curved moldings?
If so:
One way is to cut the curve from plywood or mdf faced with the correct wood (say, cherry plywood) for your project, then laminating a thin, bendable edge to each side. The edge has been previously edge shaped with a router or shaper.
Another way is to build the sides from straight stock and cut the curve. Fluting and edge treatments can then be routed. Edges are easy, a bearing-guided bit will easily follow the edge. For internal fluting, you could make a jig (sled) that holds the router in position while it rides the inside or outside curve, or jig a router table to dow it face down.
You could also check locally for a cabinet shop that owns a Williams & Hussey or similar molding machine and pay them to cut it to your specs. By using a cutter profile the shop has in stock, you'll save money.
Curve layout is easily done with a large trammel (a stick with holes spaced appropriately apart, one for an anchor, the other for a pencil) for constant radius curves, or a thin strip of wood held into a bow shape with a clamp, for fair curves.
Another options include a raised or flat panel with a straight bottom and arched top, skipping the curve altogether, or changing it to some sort of angled design.
Have fun, Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.