Using trigger to tighten Panasonic chuck


Hi,
I recently bought a 12V Panasonic drill, and I was wondering If I can use the power of the drill to tighten and loosen the chuck (squeeze the trigger and hold the chuck w/ the other hand) for when I want to move between very different sized bits?
I wrote Panasonic but received a very cryptic response:
Thank you for your inquiry. You must use the chuck key when the drill is turned off so that he can change his drill bits.
Thank you for contacting Panasonic.
Thank You, Panasonic Consumer Support
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Bascially, they are providing the method that is the safest. i.e. use the chuck key and don't use the trigger, which is what you should really do. However, in relaity a lot of people use the trigger to allow fast opening or closing of the chuck jaws. You have to be careful however when using the trigger to grab a drill bit because as soon as it grabs the chuck will spin in your palm/hand and that can sometimes be a bit "iffy" if you are not careful.
I tend to use the trigger to open the jaws but manually hand turn it to tighten up a bit as needed. it's a personal thing.
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I don't think the Panasonic cordless drills have a Key to loosen the chuck. Long ago they did supply a pry rod to loosen the chuck if you tighten it too much.

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Everybody in the free world and several people in North Korea do exactly as you described all the time. Spinning the chuck open or closed in this fashion saves a ton of time. You won't hear it from Panasonic because their lawyers told them that if someone leaves the key in the chuck and does this, or has a sharp/pointy/dangerous bit in the chuck and does this they might get sued. Just use your head, you'll be fine and so will the drill. Just make sure you properly tighten a bit using the key if it's a keyed chuck before actually drilling.

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But if your name isn't Chuck, whatinthehell are you doing using his drill bits?

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Where did you find a cordless drill recently with a chuck key?
How would they expect you to use a keyless chuck?
Tom in KY, I haven't seen a chuck key on a cordless since '97.
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snipped-for-privacy@bellsouth.net wrote:

The instructions that came with my PC drill said to *not* use the motor to do the final tightening. The chuck has two sections, and you are supposed to hold one while twisting the other.
I use the motor to get the opening close, then do the last bit by hand.
Chris
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On Thu, 12 Jan 2006 14:41:19 -0600, Chris Friesen wrote:

If you don't get it tight enough, you'll spin the drill bit in the chuck. Bad for the chuck, bad for the drill bit.
If you are popping a small hole with a sharp drill into soft material, this is not an issue. If you are drying to bore a 1/2" hole through 3/8" steel ... it's a problem.
Use your judgement ... watch the drill bit. If it starts to spin, stop and tighten it peoperly with the key.
Bill
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W Canaday wrote:

My post was in response to a question about a *keyless* chuck.
Chris
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Is it a keyless chuck? If not, simply grasping the chuck and spinning is may not get it tight enough for proper drilling.
Dave
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I assume it's a keyless chuck. I do this all the time with my 15.6V to quickly get near the correct opening. Then I put in the bit and snug it up with the drill. Then I give it a final twist with my hand to finish tightening it.
(I'm sure the guy who buys his drill based on whether the chuck clicks all the time or not is cringing at the thought of that whirring noise when you hold the chuck and hit the trigger :) )
-jj
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Wow, this is a quick-to-reply group.
Thanks for the all replies, I just wanted to double check w/ other people who owned the drill.
- Daft
ps. Panasonics said 'key', not me. Like I said, their response was pretty cryptic...
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