using a roundover bit on thin stock

I admit it. I'm a newby.
My question for the group is: How does one use a roundover bit on curved stock that is too thin to use the roller as a guide?
I cut out a decorative layout on some 3/8" stock. I want to roundover the edges. Unfortunately, I can't use my guidefence, due to the curves. I can't use a guide-roller on the bit because the board is 3/8" thick (too thick) Any ideas?
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On 12 Sep 2003, Robin Ellzey spake unto rec.woodworking:

I assume that you mean you can't use the guide bearing because the stock is too THIN, not too thick.
Use the piece you want to round over as a pattern for a template made out of scrap plywood or some such, which you can then place under your 3/8ths stock to guide the bearing. Double-sided tape or some small brads from the back will keep it all together while you rout.
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our use a single point fence
-- Tim -------- See my page @ http://www.wood-workers.com/users/timv/ (seriously needs updating)
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roundover
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Use the fence on the router table instead of the bearing. 'Course, it's got to be a split fence... Tom Someone wrote:>How would that help if the radius is still to(sic) far away from the bearing?

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Another one not paying attention.

got to

from
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I believe it could be done. But there's so much to learn. >"CW" snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net

Someday, it'll all be over....
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Hell, you don't even need a router ... sand paper works well on stock this size for rounding over edges on curved workpieces. There is also a round over edging tool available from Lee Valley that will do it by hand faster than you can set up a router.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 9/08/03
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Someone's not paying attention here.

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Purchase a woodworking file, a bastard file will do. Carefully round the edge by hand, then sand it smooth. Toss the used sandpaper, keep the used file
Bob

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I am helping a friend build a high chair, and this is exactly what we did for the curved fronts of the seat and the foot rest. Much quicker and easier than making a guide template for each piece.
Gotta love that Nicholson #49 Pattern Makers Rasp.
David
remove the key to email me.
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Two methods come to mind.
1) The easiest is with a trim router, most of which come with roller bearing *guides*--i.e., not connected to the bit--in order to do just the thing you describe (cut trim on curved parts).
2) If you have a router table (and you can make a temporary one easy for just this project with scrapwood), use a pilot pin near the bit to guide your cut.
Good luck, H
snipped-for-privacy@ellzey.net (Robin Ellzey) wrote in message

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