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That jointer is a 110 and is a Buffalo. He bought it to build a shop but has never used it. He wants 125 for it. Anyone here of these?
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When you find old iron like that you want to check out the Old Woodworking Machines website at owwm.com for info about the manufacturer, model, manuals, etc. Buffalo was a good brand. I don't own any tools from that company but I've seen some as I look for them when I shop around. If the jointer is in mechanically sound shape (i.e. no cracked castings, no important parts missing [guard, fence, cutterhead], no rust *pitting* on the tables, all parts move freely, no awful grinding noises when the unit is powered on, has a motor that works and does not otherwise look as if somebody abused the thing) then with some elbow grease and a little time you'll have a swell jointer. You may have to replace the knives in the cutterhead. How many does it have (2 or 3?). If you have to buy or replace the motor then you're looking at another $100 or so for a new one, or maybe next to nothing if you can find one at a garage sale. Light surface rust is easily removed with mineral spirits and some fine grit automotive sandpaper. If it's a decent machine in good shape then the only other consideration is size: do you want a small 4" wide or a larger 6" wide machine, and what length of boards do you intend to joint with it. The longer the tables the longer the boards it'll handle. OTOH if you're just starting out as a ww'er a little 4 incher will probably suit you for some time.
J.
stryped wrote:

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