Uneven surface after edge glueing

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There are many ways, like cauls and good clamps, that will help with panel glue-up alignment. Most importantly, particularly when you're working with expensive wood, is a practice glue-up during which you take care to study and implement anything that will get the job done.
One of my methods to assist in alignment, along with a careful and practiced tecnique with a _quality_ biscuit jointer, is use of these little clamping assists across the glue joints as seen in the link below:
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Jigs.htm (scroll down to "I-Beam Supports/Clamp Assists", second picture with description)
Another way is break the task into smaller and more managable sections, do those perfectly, then glue these already leveled sections together.
In the "Trestle Table" section of the below page is a description of what it took to get this 100 pound plus glue-up perfectly flat.
http://www.e-woodshop.net/Projects5.htm (scroll to "3/20/04" section, where the table top is being glued up)
Look carefully and you can see the use of the clamp assists mentioned above, along with 'whatever it takes to get the job done' techniques that were worked out beforehand, like jointed flat "cauls" beneath the top, and use of a handy "paperweight".
IOW, the more practice, planning and thought you put behind it, the more sucessful the endeavor.
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 3/8/08
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<snip>

I don't use biscuits or dowels. Clamps and cauls work for me. I recently learned to plane both edges with a hand plane (#6 or #7), and it works great. My cs will make a glue line cut with a Forrest blade. Another tip I've used is that a few grains of sand in the glue line (4-5 grains, not much) will lock the edges up when applying clamp pressure.
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Lowell Holmes wrote:

of this tip, but it sounds like a touch of genius.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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think that box maker from Arkansas might have put it in an article. :-)
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I've used a biscuit jointer for edging several times, and I find that the slightest slip or shake of the hand translates into the workpiece. As a result, I would say I get a perfectly aligned edge only about 60% of the time, and the other times I have to compensate somehow (either by sanding the edge flat, or removing an offending buscuit and using clamps to align).
I have never once had a problem with splining though. From my very first attempt, I have gotten perfect results every time. I use an interchangable arbor with a 1/4" cutter, so my piece slides flat on the router table (or I slide my router on the surface for really big pieces). The router always slides on the 'good' surface, which means the grove is the exact same distance from the good surface on both pieces, and as long as you use tight splines, the two pieces will allign perfectly with 0 error. The only way you would get missaligned pieces using this method is if the router leaves the surface of your piece, your piece leaves the surface of the router table, or the depth of the bit changes -- none of which are likely to happen.
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