Trimming window glass for clock face

I'm closing in on completing the Shaker style clocks I started in January, and have run into a minor problem.
And what do we do when we have minor problems? (Besides a google search? I did that.) We bring them here!
Background: These are two Shaker style wall clocks, following fairly closely the article in FWW, Aug 2002, C. Becksvoort. The mechanical movements are sitting in their shipping cases, awaiting installation. The brasses are installed. Tried & True Varnish oil has been applied, and is in the curing stages, on the cherry clock, and to the large panel on the quilted maple version.
So. Glass for the clock face doors. Approx. 8.5" square. I had some cut at the local, excellent hardware store. Double strength window glazing, to my written measurements. The fellow asked to what precision I needed this cut, and I told him 1/32". It still came out a bit large, in one dimension, for each of two pieces.
I'd rather trim than return and squawk about this. It's not a big deal, although I know he'd make it good, if I asked. It's that kind of place.
What I understand is that I can't trim with a glass cutter the small amount remaining to be removed.
Can it be sanded or ground in some manner? If so, what safety precautions should be taken? What tools?
Or have I started with the wrong material to begin with, and should find a glass shop to do this? (Taking the doors off, and in with me, etc.)
I'd like to have this all finished for the woodworker's club meeting next week, so's I can show off a bit. If the digital camera can be located, I'll post pics as well.
Patriarch
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Why double strength? Single should be more than adequate for a clock.
In any event, glass is cheap. Just have a new pane cut, about 1/16 undersize. It's not worth the time and trouble to try to abrade the other one down to the right size.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
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On Wed, 07 Apr 2004 21:29:58 GMT, patriarch

if it isn't much material to remove, go at it with your scary sharp setup. just start with about 80 grit. no special equipment needed, gloves if you have thin skin, maybe.
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snipped-for-privacy@igetenoughspamalreadythanks.com wrote in wrote:

That seems like a good, low risk, low cost way to start. There's LOTS of scary sharp materials around here.
Thanks!
Patriarch, who believes that sometimes, his thinker needs a jump start....
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I've found that when I build with the intent of installing glass, I simply take the piece into my local glass shop and have them cut the glass to fit. This is especially helpful when the opening is not exactly square. I simply tell them what gap/clearance I want and they do the rest. As the actress on Curb Your Enthusiasm said (the one who got the boob job), "Genius!"
Jim

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it generally is done with a diamond bit grinder not unlike a router, with a water feed. if not done wet, the dust created causes silicosis, and the heat produced will cause the pane to crack.
you could take it to a stained glass shop or perhaps a normal window glass shop (unless you know someone who does stained glass) and pay them a few dollars to shrink the glass, but it would be less hassle and even perhaps cost less to just buy more glass.
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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