To build or to buy, router tabletop

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On Sat, 10 Nov 2007 08:35:25 -0800, Larry Blanchard

In reality, any track is theoretically always square to the bit. _Somewhere_ on the bit...
If the track is square (parallel or perpendicular) to the fence or table edges is another story. Mine isn't perfect, and I really don't care! <G>
If I really need it parallel to the fence, I tap the fence into place.
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Better than that, DEFINE "square to the bit" The only two relationships between the fence and the bit that seem important is distance and fence parallel (vertically) to the axis of the bit. I don't see what "Square to the bit" could possibly mean.
--
Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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Especially since the bit is round and spinning, there's nothing to be "square" to. You can be square to a blade, but not to a bit.
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The only thing I can think is that he meant the T track and the fence when you router? The T track can go anywhere and will be straight to the bit when it makes contact with the wood that goes thru. I can understand if the miter is not 90 degrees to the fence and T track, then I can see a problem.
wrote:

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On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:04:03 -0500, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

I keep it simple, maybe because I'm bad at math and theory.. My current fence is 2 layers of 3/4 MDF with bolts through them, slots in the table and wing nuts.. If I need more or less bit exposed, I move either end.. all I'm adjusting is space between the edge of whatever I'm routing and the bit, so it just doesn't seem to include rocket science.. Then again, I have been called a space cadet..
mac
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On Mon, 12 Nov 2007 19:04:03 -0500, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>The only thing I can think is that he meant the T track and the fence when

Sure, I pointed that out before that you can be square to the fence, but not the bit because there's nothing about the bit to be square to.
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Some tips on router table design, function and creation:
http://patwarner.com/router_table.html *****************************************************
On Nov 8, 9:27 pm, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

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After constructing a half-dozen different designs over years for use in full-time production work, the best router table I found is the downsized shaper table with a router bit collet. Both Delta and Powermatic make a one-horse model, small enough to pick up and move against the wall for storage, but heavy enough to absorb the vibrations. The table facilitates all adjustment, and the router bearing may be eliminated for greater flexibility in the cut. Before anybody complains of the slower speed...7000/10,000 vs 25,000...it is significant to the finished cut, it reduces high-speed chatter and promotes a higher degree of safety and longevity in the life of the bit at the slower speeds. The weight of the cast iron tabletop provides a factor in the quality of the cut that is apparent the first time you use it.
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"noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote in message

Good arguments can be made for buying or building. If you truly are a woodworker for the fun of it, building a table should be a good project. OTOH, if you want to get to making trivets for Christmas gifts, buying makes some sense.
In my case, my wife insisted she wanted to buy me a gift. Rather than argue, I conceded. I have a Benchdog and like it a lot. www.benchdog.com
Take a look at the specs, including top thickness. Take a look at the location of the plate, towards the front. I found that to be a nice feature since it can be used on either the short or long side as needed.
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On Nov 8, 11:27 pm, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

I really liked this page when I was designing mine, gave me a lot of ideas.
When I get time I'm going to do a webpage about the fence design I came up with using 8020 bearings.
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wrote:

I'd like to see that, when you get time.
Regarding Incra: just do it. You won't be sorry.
--
Bob the Tomato

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Sorry, I'm an idiot, heres the page.
http://home.pacbell.net/jdismuk/routertable.html
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com says...

You have company. I looked for it for five minutes. :-)
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On Fri, 9 Nov 2007 00:27:54 -0500, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:>What are your opinions?
Given a choice where time isn't an problem, I'd build it. That way you get exactly what you want and don't have to settle for what someone else decided to offer for sale. I've built a lot of different tables over the years, adding features that I've found I need and getting rid of innovations that I never use and now I've got a table that nobody anywhere offers anything like. Add to that the experience you get by making it yourself and there really is no question.
Store-bought tables are great for people who need it right now or who have no skills or who have more money than sense, but otherwise... do it yourself. It'll give you something to be proud of every time you use it.
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On Nov 9, 12:27 am, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

Open frame base. To heck with the noise, an enclosed base will overheat. Fast.
Spare your back. Hinge the top to the back rail so you can raise it for easy bit changes.
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I just bought this from Lee Valley for my next table..
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=2&pA776&cat=1,43000,51208&ap=1
It give you the choice of under the table adjustments, or just lifting the sucker out and using it free hand.. Can't beat their guarantee, either.. lol
I don't bend, lean or stoop anymore unless I really have to.. lol
mac
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wrote:

Not in my experience, with a 4" dust collection hose attached and suitable holes. I've used my enclosed table for hours on end and the router actually stays cooler than during steady handheld use.
My DC would choke if the only makeup air came though the bit hole, so I have additional holes in the cabinet that allow plenty of air flowing over and through the motor. Outside the table, the fence collector and cabinet collector are wye'd to a 6" DC trunk.
In addition to the forced cool air, another factor in my experience may be the internal fan on the motor continuing to spin as the router runs without a load between work pieces.
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On Nov 9, 12:27 am, "noreaster" <noreaster1athotmaildotcom> wrote:

I built mine out of a salvaged table top from a Subway sandwich shop/ I went to an aluminum place and bought some scrap angles and rectangular tube (3' x " x 36") to form a fence /fence support. Built a base useing drawers salvaged from on old heavy office desk. Having said that, I also looked at the 99$ ryobi router/table package at Home Depot last night and realized that a manufactured fence can outshine any I might construct. Look at teh way they adjust the left side of the fence from flush to proud and think about replicating that in the home shop!
I would like to afford one of those cast iron tops - but can't justify the expense.
THe fellow who made the suggestion for using a shaper - heavy duty base and motor, albeit lower speeds, was right on. Once I built my first router table (this is my third) I realized I wanted to exchange my PC690 for the heftier 3.5" HD router (3715?) . And it would seem that the addition of speed controls to the PC690 line was s[specifically designed to allow one to reduce the speed (the switch on mine went and I traded it out for a fixed speed model).
So, thee's another two-cents worth for you to mull ove.
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"noreaster" wrote:

<snip>
Ya pays ya money, ya takes ya pick.
On one hand, a couple of saw horses, a 36x36 piece of 3/4 MDF with a 2" hole in the center and a router fixed base centered on it and your in business.
Add a couple of C-Clamps and a straight edge, you have a fence.
Simple to set up, then knock down and store when you are finished.
On the other hand, a router station such as the NYW version.
More complex, more time to build, more cost, but more function (Bit storage, dust collection, etc).
I've done both, they both work.
As I said, "Ya pays ya money, ya takes ya pick."
Lew
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Thanx for all of your input. I will be making my mine with 2 3/4" MDF with formica on both sides, the size I'm still thinking about. The fence will be 2 piece and shimable, maybe micrometer adjustable ( I have a few I could use). It'll have a T track in front an top and I could add a upper fence to make it taller when needed. I could make offset zero clearance inserts that could have up to 4 patterns on each. The plate I would get from rockler, just drill a hole for the router raizer that I have install on my Hitichi M12 ( which I just saw at a show in York, Pa, Sat for 89.95). The bench I would have to think about, I don't have the room for one, but a enclosed foldable for a bench would do. I'll post some drawings in the REC when I all this info figured out.
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