Thickness planer snipe

Page 1 of 2  
I know its been flogged to death, and I'm sick of looking through the archives, but I have an old cheapy Chinese 12.5" bench model that snipes everything. The in and outfeed tables are weak as worm's water and droop if I breathe on them.
Now it occurred to me that snipe always happens on the last two inches of the plank (in my case - never had snipe at the beginning) and so, as the feed rollers are two inches from the cutter head, the snipe occurs when the plank has passed the infeed roller and somehow, either the plank lifts, or the cutterhead drops when the first roller loses contact.
My feed rollers have always had difficulty feeding my planks (probably needs an adjustment, but I can't see where) and so I have always had to virtually push everything through the thing with 3x2s poking through the stand legs against a wall so I don't push the thing over.
I was thinking that to get this thing back into service (has been idle for years) I should remove the feed plates, screw a plank of melamine to the base, and perhaps remove the feed rollers, and either push material through against the rotation of the cutter head, or even gently allow the material to be slowly dragged through by the cutter head. I'm aware of the potential dangers of this system, as it will make a fine spear thrower. Any ideas, warnings, experience at this?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 23, 7:40 pm, snipped-for-privacy@spam.heaven wrote:

My idea is that you should buy a better planer and not throw good time and money at an inferior machine.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 16:58:02 -0800 (PST), RicodJour

dissassembled, finished, and reassembled. Usually involves remaking some parts. Spend your time and money more wisely and just get something decent to start with.
The chinese one is almost as good a boat anchor as a planer.
--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote: [...]

My first idea is that you are not, in fact, aware of the potential dangers, or at least not as fully aware of them as you think you are. You seem to be overlooking the fact that the feed rollers perform a second function, in addition to feeding the stock: holding it down against the base. By removing the feed rollers, you don't create *potential* dangers -- you create *actual* dangers.
Realize, too, that there is no such thing as "gently allow[ing] the material to be slowly dragged through by the cutter head." Instead, picture the material being instantly snatched into the machine by the cutter head, possibly dragging your hands along with it, and ejected at 60+ mph.
What you propose is highly dangerous. Don't do it. Better to spend your time and money on better-quality equipment.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Un less I am seriousely mistaken about "this" machine the cutter head would throw the work back out at you, not pull the wood in. Neither of my planers would do this.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 23:38:07 -0600, "Leon"

'Pends what end you put it in, doesn't it?
jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

He was talking about removing the feed rollers and manually feeding the work in the _same_ direction as the cutter head rotation.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Yeah I get that now, I only consider the in feed side as feed rollers. I normally think of the outfeed rollers not so much as feed rollers but more as extraction rollers, thanks for confirming. That would be rather dangerous.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"FrozenNorth" wrote...

Makes me wonder though, how those old Craftsman 6" 103.1801 manual feed thickness planers worked. I think they had some sort of anti-kickpack danglers before and after the cutterhead, and that they were intended to be used by two people - one feeding, one pulling. They were open-ended, so you could reverse the piece and thickness a 12" board, the way a lot of thickness sanders are. Don't know what was used for pressure to keep the workpiece flat on the table.
-- Timothy Juvenal www.tjwoodworking.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"TJ" wrote

I very much admire your woodworking ... very impressive!
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/14/07
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Timothy Juvenal www.tjwoodworking.com
Nice work!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Dec 23, 4:40pm, snipped-for-privacy@spam.heaven wrote:

I have a medium quality planer (Delta 22-580) that snipes on both ends. To be fair to Delta I never tried adjusting anything but I get by the sniping this way:
As I begin feeding the board I lift the tail end of the board slightly, as it exits the planer I lift the front end of the board slightly.
This easily prevents sniping on my planer and it may work on yours. Very light pressure upwards is all it takes, just enough to keep the board horizontal.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
">snip
I have a medium quality planer (Delta 22-580) that snipes on both ends. To be fair to Delta I never tried adjusting anything but I get by the sniping this way:
As I begin feeding the board I lift the tail end of the board slightly, as it exits the planer I lift the front end of the board slightly.
This easily prevents sniping on my planer and it may work on yours. Very light pressure upwards is all it takes, just enough to keep the board horizontal.
It works on my Delta planer too! :-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It doesn't work on my Delta TP200. Other than that the machine is a work horse for the money.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

That, or use a sled with consumable wood glued in a trailing position and let it take the snipe.
Usually, I just allow for snipe when I'm measuring and cutting. Part of the waste built into the project.
--
Help improve usenet. Kill-file Google Groups.
http://improve-usenet.org /
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 23 Dec 2007 17:39:14 -0800 (PST), RayV

That techniques also works beautifully on my Jet 13" Planer/Molder (JPM-13CS)
Tom Veatch Wichita, KS USA
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 24 Dec 2007 09:40:37 +0900, snipped-for-privacy@spam.heaven wrote:

Difficulty feeding is usually caused by dirty feed rollers. Clean them and see if it feeds. I wouldn't operate without them working properly. To do so is an accident waiting to happen.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 24 Dec 2007 09:40:37 +0900, snipped-for-privacy@spam.heaven wrote:

Thanks for all the warnings, folks, I really was aware of the dangers, but was not thinking straight. I was imagining extremely light feeds, but of course, from past experience, that is not always predictable, as I've stalled the bloody thing once or twice, and without the counteracting feed rollers, it would have been goodnight for whatever was in the way, even brick walls, with the 40 lb planks I was working on. Maybe that's why the rollers are not adjustable, in case idiots who have my idea don't ask advice first and might adjust them away from the work.
I will try the plank of melamine and watch what happens when snipe occurs. Seems a following plank can cure it sometimes, which means the cutter head moves somehow when one of the rollers becomes unloaded.
Seems snipe can be caused by several reasons and curing one thing does not always cure the snipe. jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You might try filling in the underside of you in/ outfeed tables with a piece of MDF or something. That should stiffen them up for you but honestly, don't throw money at this unit. There are some adequate units available in the $200+ area. My Delta TP 200 was about that (obsolete now).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

What I'm going to try is screwing from the underside of the base casting a 3' x 1' piece of melamine I have. The bottom (adjustable) rollers are not much use on this machine AFAICS and the melamine will be much slipperier.
Much of my sniping was when i was working on 10' planks of 8" x 1.5" jarrah. A bit of stretching the envelope, you might say. I supported the end while I fed it in, and all was well until when I dragged the plank out the other end over my roller stand, I would get a pronounced snipe whatever I tried to do, and trying things with a 40# plank tires you out rather quickly. Not pleasant, except for the joy of the grain so exposed.
Now, most of what I want to do is some 3' lengths of this, and some 4" x 3/4" jarrah fence palings. Or even short lengths of these for my drawer sides (in another post). Of course, the thicknesser will not have as much to do now, as I have an 8" jointer to clean up the rough sawn stuff first.
Talking of this jointer, the instruction manual says the widest stuff you can work is 4". Is this a misprint? (Chinese)
jack
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.