The Time / Money / Age Paradox

You’ve heard the old maxim “Time is money.”
You’ve no doubt heard “Youth - it’s a pity it’s wasted on the young.”
You’ve also heard the buzz about the DOMINO and it’s price tag.
And that got me pondering the Time / Money / Age Paradox.
Two of my “kids” (by “kids” I mean between 4 and mid 30s and by “my kids” I mean people I’ve emotionally become attached to who may or may not be biologically related) have a gift for and an interest in woodworking. One is a contractor and loves carpentry, the other likes to make furniture he can’t find anywhere and couldn’t afford to buy if he could find it somewhere. Niether has much “spare time” or “spare money”.
And I’ve met other woodworkers with a real gift and passion for woodworking - but “no spare money” and very little “spare time” - who just can’t afford a tool or two that could free their creativity and reduce the grunt work significantly.
Isn’t it ironic that when you’re young and have NO “spare time” AND almost NO “spare money”, you can’t afford the “time saving tools” (or the nice wood) to make stuff you can’t afford to buy. Yet by the time you do have “spare time” and do have “spare money”, you already have the nice furniture and can afford the “time saving tools”.
The “time saving tools” are wasted on the old?
My question to the group:
If you’ve upgraded to a new (and improved, quicker, easier, more accurate) tool and don’t have the “extra space” to keep its predecessor, what do you do with “its predecessor”? a) Would you consider “passing it on” to someone who could really use it but can’t afford to buy it?
b) How do you find that person?
Having had several wonderful mentors who taught me so much - and gave me so many of their “old” tools and equiptment, along with a wealth of knowledge of a subject, I’ve tried over the years to follow their example. And I’ve come to learn that you get back something that money can’t buy and that I could never explain to someone who thinks “time is money”.
Just something to think about - or not.
charlie b
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Describes what I do. If not my kids, some of the folks who drop by for shop time or tips will do. The price? Nothing. Does carry a moral obligation to pass it on for the same price to someone else if they upgrade.
If not an individual, it goes up to the school to add to their inventory. My castoffs are normally as good or better than what they have. New guy doesn't keep things as tuned and sharpened as they used to be. I considered teaching tool maintenance as important as tool use.
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A. Yes. I've never sold a tool. For that matter, not much else either. I'd rather give stuff away or donate to Salvation Army stores than try to make a few bucks. Seling something makes me h appy. Giving it away, makes two people happy.
B. I've been fortunate there. I may know someone that would love to have my old tool. If not, I take it to work with a free sign and it is always taken.
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Yup.
Posted here. http://www.homediscussion.com/showthread.php?tx474
-- Mark
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