Teak Outdoor Furnature- Protection methods?

What is proper method of protecting outdoor teak furnaure to retain original color ? Is treating with teak oil desirable ? Is staining possible ? I would like to prevent wood from graying ? What is most frequently method used ? Thanks
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Typically, we use teak with the expectation that it will age to a silver color, so no surface finish is applied. It is possible to stain, and spar varnish is probably your best bet for protection in the outdoors. Any finish is going to change the color, somewhat, so test in an inconspicuous area, first.
Kevin
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Teak oil. Teak is the best wood for boats, water does not destroy it, or, it takes a very long time.
Alex
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Thanks, Kevin, Alex and Bill for the information and education. I now have a better understanding of what to do.

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Before you use teak oil, read the label. Probably it is just diluted linseed oil. Tung oil is probably better than linseed, but read the label. An oil _finish_ usually is diluted oil and 100% pure oil is typically a better buy. You can dilute it cheaper yourself if you like.
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A decent teak oil will work, but you have to do it often. I gave up on my teak bench and now it is silver.
Try your same posting on rec.cruising (serious boating hangout), or try to get to a marine store.
If you want to seal it you can try Cetol (by Sika), or some equivalent. It is pricey , but it will hold up to the UV and water. This is more like a varnish than oil. Again, you have to do it often and should start with multiple coats.
Good luck.
Bill
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If you want to use Cetol, get the Cetol light. I used the regular marine grade and it darkened the cypress more than I liked. It actually hides the grain like a stain more than like a clear poly or oil finish The "light" is not supposed to darken as much.
Penofin oil is supposed to be good also. I used it on some mahogany this years. Since it has only been maybe 6 weeks, I'm reluctant to say how good it is long term. It does look good and does not cover or block the grain like the Cetol did. The Penofin does have UV blockers. They do have a web page with more information. Ed
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I know this will sound strange, but when my dad bought his boat in 1985, it had some teak trim (rails, swim platform, etc.) the dealer suggested treating it periodically with transmission oil. That has been done intermittantly now for 19 years (sometimes once a year sometimes once every two or three years ;))and the trim still looks pretty darn good. A bit darker than new but how much that is caused by aging and how much due to the type of oil I do not know. Also, whether I would want that around kids or for sittin' my butt on I don't know.
Dave Hall
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You are fighting nature to retain the color. But, you can use a UV clear protectant every year. I use CWF.
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Teak oil works but you will have to redo it from time to time. We used it and other products on our sailboat and oil works as well as anything. Go to a good marine store and they can provide an mild acid treatment that will return grayed teak to a golden color. The oil will enrich the gold. It ususally grays anyway in 1-2 years. We tried spar varnish too and it tends to lift after a while.

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I grew up in Japan and my dad bought a great deal of teak furniture. When he bought it the furniture salesman told him that the best way to protect his furniture (several thousands worth in the 80's) was to use a high grade motor oil. My dad's had that furniture for over 20 years,and it still looks as dark as the day he bought it. They didn't have any synthetic motor oils in the 80's, but I believe that's what my dad uses now. Good luck.
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On Mon, 23 Aug 2004 23:31:27 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net calmly ranted:

And your mom and dad's clothes all smell yummy after sitting on that furniture, don't they?
"I love the smell of Castrol in the morning..."
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Never underestimate the innate animosity of inanimate objects.
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