bamboo vs teak for outdoor project

I need about 10' of 3/4 x 2" stock to trim a couple of patio tables. Considering the cost and difficulty of finding teak, does anyone have an idea of the durability of bamboo? I'm a "build it and forget it" type -- not interested in maintenance.
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On 10/30/2017 6:16 PM, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Eco-Friendly
Bamboo is a much more environmentally friendly building material than hardwood. As you probably know, many of the Earth’s forests have been destroyed by harvesting wood, which is one reason hardwood has become increasingly expensive over the past 10 years. Bamboo is responsibly harvested and the grass can regenerate itself in as little as 3-5 years. Compare that to hardwood trees which can take up to 50 years to regenerate and you can see why bamboo is the more eco-friendly decking material. More Affordable
Many people choose the look of exotic hardwoods like cherry and teak for their decking, but these woods can costs as much as $10 per square foot. That can really add up. Compare that to bamboo, which generally costs between $3 and $5, and you can see how the savings can really add up. As Tough and Durable as Hardwood Decking
So you already know bamboo is the more eco-friendly choice, as well as wallet-friendly choice, but you’re probably wondering how durable bamboo is. After all we’re talking decking, something that will live outdoors and have to stand up to pets and kids running around on it, not to mention the elements like sun, rain and snow.
Bamboo is incredibly durable and actually harder than maple and red oak, which is pretty darn hard. It can stand up to dings and scratches with the best of them, and, if maintained properly, you can expect your bamboo deck to last for up to 20 years. Moisture and Rot Resistant
Speaking of standing up to the elements…
Because bamboo is actually a grass and not a wood, it resists moisture and rot very well. Exactly what you should be looking for in a decking material. This means a floor with less gapping and cupping and, well, rotting.
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On Mon, 30 Oct 2017 18:52:16 -0500, Unquestionably Confused

Most commercial teak is plantation-grown. Blew your cred on one count.

Cherry? Exotic? Blew your cred on two counts.

Who in their right mind would use cherry for "decking"? For an indoor floor sure, but for "decking"? Blew your cred on three counts. Per Ian Fleming, once is happenstance, twice is circumstance, three times is enemy action--I'm done with this post.
<remainder of sales pitch for bamboo trimmed>
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On 10/30/2017 10:04 PM, J. Clarke wrote:

I'd not limit myself to just two woods either. There are a bunch of others that do well outdoors. Spanish cedar, mahogany, tiger wood (goncalo alves), etc. I used tiger wood for my deck. Still looks great.
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On 30 Oct 2017 16:16:01 -0700 (PDT) " snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net" wrote:

mold loves bamboo
i had to store some bamboo flooring remnants outside and was surprised how much mold grew on the bamboo as compared with other wood stored together
the other wood had no mold at all
maybe only some species of bamboo exhibit this problem it is possible that farm grown bamboo is a monoculture and the one they chose is susceptible to mold
planned obsolescence via mold
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