Talk me out of a Harbor Freight Lathe

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Okay, as I posted before, my lathe is dead and really not worth fixing. (Old Craftsman, long tube stylem, bearings are shot, motor is salvaged, stand is crap.)
I'm looking at a few options, and I KNOW that I really should not consider the ones at Harbor Freight, but with money tight right now, I really am tempted.
Are there some actual valid reasons I should avoid these? (I'm looking at a 12" capacity lathe)
Mark
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<(Amazon.com product link shortened)? v=glance&n"8013&nP7846&s=hi&v=glance>
Will last you a looooong time And hold resale value. While lots of folks do decent work on HF, it'll lose 75% of its value when you walk out the door. Also, I recommend Not buying HF unless you have a store near you where you can get up close and personal with the product - it also helps that it is easier to return the DOAs.
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If money is really tight, try this... http://www.mimf.com/articles/lathe /
I did, see it here... http://members.tfproductions.com/joebettystein/page5.html
Have fun. Joe
Mr. Moose wrote:

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Yes, they are generally not well made compared to other brands. Worth waiting for a quality tool, IMO. The gratification of a cheap tool will not last nearly as long as the wait to buy a good one.
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On Sun, 06 Nov 2005 04:42:59 +0000, Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

I'll do my best to respectively disagree. I do good work on my HF 12x36. The wood goes round and round and I cut off the parts I want to then I sand and finish and sell them.
What part of this equation doesn't make sense to you? If you are buying a tool to earn money with, buy the cheapest one that will do the job rather than missing income opportunities while you save for a 'better' one. I've been turning only about a year. My HF lathe long ago paid for itself and the wood keeps going round and round and round. Just like on a Nova except not as slow (stay awake when chucking!) and I don't have as much expense to recover before putting money in my pocket.
Some day I'll probably get a Stubby or a Woodmaster -- "The Whole Enchilada" makes my eyes glaze over. Or maybe even one of the bigger Novas. But I'm making money right now instead of waiting for the day I could afford what the tools snobs think of as an entry level tool. And that, for me, is the name of the game.
Bill
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Finally, a voice of reason.
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wrote:

Very cool, Joe, and it must be satisfying to do work on a lathe you built yourself.
Mark
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Sun, Nov 6, 2005, 3:22am (EST+5) snipped-for-privacy@pacbell.net (Mr.Moose), but it's only 11:30 Sat here: Okay, as I posted before, my lathe is dead <snip> I KNOW that I really should not consider the ones at Harbor Freight, <snip> Are there some actual valid reasons I should avoid these? (I'm looking at a 12" capacity lathe)
It's your money, you're a big boy, spend it any way you want. I've got a HF lathe, had it for years. $129 I think it was new, 39" between centers, works great, much sturdier, "and" better quality, than severl I saw for around $300. I made my own stand, plywood, and it doesn't walk, or vibrade. Hmm, painted the stand white, should have painted it yellow. But, did paint the lathe yellow.
Or, you can make your own. Any size you want, metal or wood, your choice.
JOAT If it ain't broke, don't lend it. - Red Green
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J T wrote:

Amen JOAT, and who cares if it loses 75% of its cost as you go out the door. Its being bought to use, not to resell. I paid $79 for mine (36066) 2 years ago and have no intention of shitcanning it. Paid 3x that for my Jet midi and I'm pleased with both. Not all of us can afford nor want to afford a $5000 Nova or whatever the tool gatherers and the professionals can afford. John
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Mon, Nov 7, 2005, 5:02pm (EST-2) snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (JohnDeBoo) did sayeth it like it is: Amen JOAT, and who cares if it loses 75% of its cost as you go out the door. Its being bought to use, not to resell. <snip>
Perzactly. Mine does what I got it for, it will outlast me, I don't intend to get rid of it, so I don't care what its resale value is. And, I painted it yellow.
The ONLY way I would upgrade is if I turned Pro turner - the Woodworking Gods giggled at that thought. But, if it did, I'd probably make the next one. May eventually make a bowl turning lathe anyway. I'd still keep the HF lathe in either event. Inexpensive doesn't always mean cheap.
JOAT If it ain't broke, don't lend it. - Red Green
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"Mr. Moose" wrote in message

Don't own one myself, but a good friend, who is a gunsmith and makes custom black powder rifles (he presented one of his to Ronald Reagan in the oval office, presentation of which made the cover of NRA mag way back when), owns one and loves it. he is obviously very handy with metal working tools and did a lot of customization to it, but he swears by it.
Strictly FWIW ...
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Find the closest turners club and contact them. Someone always has a used lathe for sale, (American Assn. of Woodturners) robo hippy
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Black powder rifles aren't really made with extreme precision anyway.
Swingman wrote:

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So, by that statement you're implying that the tool, a lathe here, is the arbitor of the craftsmanship and not the craftsman? I saw an article a long time ago in a magazine about a guitar maker, a profession I think you're agree requires a great deal of precision, in Mexico who's only real power tool was a skilsaw mounted upside down in a kitchen table to function as literally, a table saw! Its the craftsman, NOT the tool!
Mike Berger wrote:

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"Mike Berger" wrote in message

Neither are most wood turnings ...
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If his friend is the maker I think he means, then your statement is amusingly and amazingly ill-informed.
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It might be true for the kit guns that people buy and assemble. I'm not sure, it's been a long time and I've not seen many of them, anyway. Custom-made muzzleloaders are an entirely different breed from the mass-produced ones. Well, depending on the gunsmith, too.
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(Gestures with rolled up newspaper...)
Bad Mike! Bad! Bad! Bad Mike!
Maybe this was actually posted by Bay Area Dave in disguise.......?

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Small world. I suppose you're a member of the Wood workers Club of Houston, too, aren't you. If so, see you Saturday. I'll be the one with the WWCH hat on.
I also have a copy of the American Rifleman you mention. Somewhere I've also got the Post/Chronicle feature about him bagging a 10 point with a .40 flinter he made.
I've got one of his rocklocks stocked in cherry. Apparently the only one he ever made out of cherry, as he developed an allergy just before he got to the finishing stage on it. Chris will remember this rifle (besides the allergy) as he sweated bullets trying to make a silk purse out of a sows ear with the lock. He told me he spent over 20 hours tuning it as an experiment to see if you could make a great lock out of a cheap lock. You can't, but he did improve it to a linen purse quality. Actually, the frizzen still throws great sparks, but the lock needs better internals for a quicker cock fall. I knew that from dry firing it before I bought it, but heck, when you REALLY want something, that little bit of common sense seems to hide or something. Actually, this is not a problem for someone who holds his shootin' iron rock solid, but I'm one of those who have to squeeze a round off as the target wiggles by.
He does excellent work, and his fancy rifles are truly works of art. Mine is a "poor boy" style of about 1810-1820. I get it out and shoot it every now and then for fun, and have been known to hit a barn from the inside with it.
Funny you posted this. At the T.A.B. two weekends ago, a couple of us were "wondering whatever happened to Chris". Nobody has seen him in a coons age, and only Badger and a few others remember how he got his camp name. Tell him Lomax was back for his first doin's in 6 years, and the next T.A.B. is the last weekend in January up near Palestine this year. The usual directions: look for pie plates, bring wood and water.
Well, I managed to really wander OT here, but at least I did mention wood, which is better than some of the other topics. Keep yer powder dry,
Roy

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"Roy" wrote in message ...

Nope ... don't belong to the club, but I did take Chris to raise at one time, sort of ;) ... (bought one of his rifles when he first started out, the long term loan of a truck at the time, and took him along on a Mexican dove hunt with a bunch of my clients back in the high roller days of the oil bidness, which he'll never forget, or live down, cuz I taught him a thing or two about wing shooting, IIRC).
AAMOF, and back on topic, he's the guy who told me about HF when it first opened here in Houston.

Funny ... although I haven't seen him in a long while myself, I do listen to him on KPFT on occasion. But, as it happens, I will see him this Saturday. I'm hired to sub on bass for a band at a local music festival and I understand that Chris's band will be playing on the bill.
Besides being an artisan with the rifles, he's also a talented multi-instrumentalist who's done work in my recording studio down through the years. AAMOF, I engineered and produced that album ("Pecos Wind"?) that he did years ago with the likes of Kenny Baker, Uncle Josh Graves, Byron Berline, Charlie Cline, Roland White, Beppe Gambetta, to name a few ... that boy can hang with the best musically.
I'll mention that you were asking about him in the wild woods of Usenet.
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