Talc as Rust Protection

Page 5 of 8  
On Wed, 20 Oct 2004 06:09:12 -0700, Larry Jaques

I agree with you, Larry.
On the Moh Scale (as opposed to the Larry and Curly Scales, which are similar but have differnces with regards to the hirsute) Talc is rated as a "1" and Asbestos, which is a Silicate, and thus a subset of Quartz, is rated as a "7".
Even if you were to average them, they would wind up being Fluorspar, which, of course, is rated at a "4", and I, for one would never put Fluorspar on a babies bottom, or a Tablesaur, for that matter.
Nyuk Nyuk.
Regards, Tom.
"People funny. Life a funny thing." Sonny Liston
Thomas J.Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet (real email) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
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only to a very remote degree, and it is in no way "a subset of quartz". Fact is, asbestos is much more similar, chemically, to talc than to quartz.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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Has asbestos ever been a legitimate health concern other than though exposure by inhalation?
If your kid inhales a crayon, asbestosis would seem to be the least of his worries.
--

FF

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Oct 2004 21:13:21 +0000 (UTC), Andrew Barss
: Talc and asbestos are both amphibole minerals (a whole lot of minerals : are amphiboles - if it's a calcium / magnesium silicate, chances are : that it's an amphibole). _Some_ talc deposits have associated asbestos : deposits with them. _Some_ talc minerals have been mined from these : deposits, leading to contamination with asbestos.
: If you're selecting talc to make cosmetic grade talcum powder, you : didn't use these deposits anyway. You wanted something that milled : finely, and the last thing you need is some tough old fibre in there.
Thanks for the correction.
I did a quick Google search, and found this:
http://www.preventcancer.com/consumers/cosmetics/talc.htm http://www.doctorgeorge.com/article.php?sidh8
which cite studies suggesting that talc by itself is a carcinogen.
    -- Andy Barss
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Not necessarily an accurate or unbiased source. Calling asbestos a "potent carcinogen" is disingenious at best.
Scaremongering of the worst sort ("Talc kills babies every year!").

And this one is priceless.
"another research undertaken in 1988 showed that 52% of respondents with ovarian cancer _regularly_ used talc"
I'll bet 52% of respondents with ovarian cancer regular drink water with breakfast too. But that has no correlation with cancer risk.
Now it may indeed be that talc and ovarian cancer are linked, but nothing on either of these two sites provides convincing evidence thereof.
We do know now that the dangers of asbestos to the general public (i.e. non-miners) is wildly overinflated.
More on asbestos available here: <http://www.jamesphogan.com/bb/content/111202.shtml
scott
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A few years ago a spoof study was released stating that dihydrogen oxide, a primary constituent in certain types of foam, such as that used in the foam take-home food containers at restaurants, might be responsible for certain types of cancer. As you can imagine, the media ran with the story, creating a minor furor. A few environmental organizations even asked Congress to look into the matter.
Max
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LOL!
A local talk show host had someone in from the city water bureau and hit him with the rumors of dihydrogen monoxide being detected in our local water supply. The rumor was emphatically denied!
--
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wrote in message

I remember a parody of that sort from back when I was in high school in the early 1970's. That was back when there were pull-tabs on beer and soda cans and there was an UL about collecting them to fund dialysis. Pull-tabs are long gone, but the UL survives.

That sounds like more UL to me. I've never seen even one story, let alone one falling for the spoof, in any media.
--

FF

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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) wrote:

There wasn't one on Snopes, either. But at http://www.snopes.com/toxins/dhmo.htm , there is a story about a Jr. High student who won a science fair with a project of testing students for their gullibility to this story. That page also includes one version of a report on the dangers of DHMO. An update included this item:
:Update: In March 2004 the California municipality of Aliso Viejo :(a suburb in Orange County) came within a cat's whisker of falling for :this hoax after a paralegal there convinced city officials of the :danger posed by this chemical. The leg-pull got so far as a vote :having been scheduled for the City Council on a proposed law that :would have banned the use of foam containers at city-sponsored events :because (among other things) they were made with DHMO, a substance :that could "threaten human health and safety."
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) writes:

Penn and Teller did this on their Showtime show (Bull***t). They got people to sign a petition to ban dihydrogen monoxide and had several "spokespersons" for various enviro orgs endorsing their efforts. Would have been funny, if it wasn't so tragic.
scott

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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in message

I have a videoclip in which Senator John McCain accuses Karl Rove of dynamiting the Old Man in the Mountain in New Hampshire to revenge Bush's loss in the year 2000 primary.
I'm sure that spokesmen for environmental organizations enjoy a good joke as much as anyone else. Penn and Teller are famous.
They are also stage magicians, entertainers. Stage Magicians often use shills. Nothing wrong with that, but it should not be confused with reality.
So though I remain amused, I also remain unconvinced.
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snipped-for-privacy@spamcop.net (Fred the Red Shirt) writes:

However, their showtime show is _not_ about magic, and _is_ about reality. No shills. The idiots were all real people (cherrypicked, perhaps, like Leno does, but real).
scott

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snipped-for-privacy@slp53.sl.home (Scott Lurndal) wrote in message

I think you missed my point entirely.
The show is a show, it doesn't have to be about magic to take advantage of traditional magic methods. Uri Gellar's shows were not about magic either, that didn't stop him from using traditional magic methods either. I tend to think that Penn and Teller probably are more honest than Gellar but they are still in it for the money.
Supposing Penn or Teller stops you in the street and asks you to sign a petition to stop dihydrogen oxide. If you 'get it' you probably also realize that you won't get on TV unless you play along.
Faith healers work the same way.
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Fred notes:

You're probably right, but one question: why would you want to get on TV, particularly portraying yourself as an idjit?
Two questions. Sorry.
Charlie Self "When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas Paine
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Charlie Self wrote:

Dunno. Ask all the people who signed release forms allowing themselves to be featured on COPS.
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Silvan notes:

What's COPS? I haven't watched much more than parts of a ball game and the news, and occasionally Jeopardy, for nearly 20 years.
Charlie Self "When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas Paine
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On 24 Oct 2004 09:17:30 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

The original reality show, dating to the late 80's. A camera crew rides with officers in different cities, on various busts, rescues, and aid calls.
Nearly every episode features some sweating, shirtless drunk sitting in his vinyl recliner, which is of course located in a trailer, trying to make sense of the situation. The show's popularity gave birth to the Comedy Central spoof "Reno 911".
I personally enjoy Reno 911.
Barry
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Ba r r y wrote:

And it's relevant to the original point because these people have to give permission to show their arrest/shame/other humiliation on TV.
"Sir, we have shots of you running out of your trailer with no pants on, including prominent views of your hair butt crack, right before the cops whacked you in the head with the billy club and washed the vomit off your belly with a fire hose before shoving you in the car. Would you please sign this release so we can feature it on national TV? Thanks."

"Excuse me sir, do you realize your balls are hanging out?"
It has its moments, but I don't usually watch it. It's a bit too stupid. (Of course, I'm not a TV watcher.)
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On Sun, 24 Oct 2004 13:16:22 -0400, Silvan

It's about as stupid as stupid can be, which is why it works when I'm in the mood for truly mindless entertainment. <G>
Barry
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Barry responds:

I always believed the argument against the inanity of TV was specious. We all need some inanity from time to time. Drivel often makes reality easier to bear.
What I can't stand for more than 30-40 minutes at a time is advertising. The marketing mind that presents itself on TV is a truly marvelous thing. One marvels that the parents didn't strangle the infant at birth.
Charlie Self "When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." Thomas Paine
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