Table Saw Recommendations

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I am going to buy a table saw and was looking for some recommendations. I am using it for various household woodworking projects, but nothing too fancy - I don't think it would be worth it to spend a whole lot on it considering how much use I think it will get.
One I have my eye on at the moment is this Craftsman one:
http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?catΎnch+Power+Tools&pid921805000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Table+Saws&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
Seems like it is a step above the very entry models because it includes the collapsible stand, extensions, 15 amps, and dust collector. Don't have any experience with the Craftsman brand, but the price seems good.
What more would I get with the more expensive models?
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Power to cut something thicker than 1/2" plywood without burning the wood and the blade, the ability to add a dado blade, a fence that actually locks where you want it, the ability to use a tenoning jig, MUCH quieter operation, less vibration, lower frustration level, glue ready cuts (no sanding necessary)...
I bought a saw like that. I regret it and will replace it with a decent contractor or cabinet saw as soon as I have the available cash.
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<SNIP>

I own a very inexpensive ($400) table saw (Delta contractor) and I have gotten a lot of mileage out of it (see my web page projects section). Do I wish I had a $2,000 saw with one of them fancy boy Biesemeyer fences? Sure I do. Do I "NEED" one, probably not, but don't tell SWMBO. :)
If I could make one coment about buying a table saw it would be get one with a CAST IRON TOP. The one you have selected is aluminum.
My advice, shop around some more.
Good luck.
--
Stoutman
http://www.garagewoodworks.com
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You need one, you just don't know it.
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Really? What have you made with yours? Lets see some pics.
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No pics, sorry.
My comment was not some sort of back handed jab at you. Once you get a really nice TS, you will sit back after the first project and say "I should have bought it long long ago".
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Stoutman wrote:

Easy Stoutman, it was clearly tongue in cheek.
re/ Cast iron v. aluminum you're right, cast iron is nice, but it's not always preferable to aluminum. What if the OP wants it for occasional use only and stores it in a very humid enviroment? In that case aluminum might be preferable.
Just my 2’ H
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Really not a problem for me. I use only on occasion, live in N.E Okla.which is not like the coast but still pretty humid. I use paste wax on cast iron work surfaces (probably once a year) and WD40 on non work surfaces such as drill press column and etc.. RM~
PS, I use an automotive buffer/grinder to buff out the wax.
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Rob Mills wrote:

Yeah, there's really no comparison. In most of the South we have to wax once a month at least. Thank god for T-9, but still it's a hassle and aluminum is nice down here.
H
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On 21 Aug 2006 18:46:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Run, don't walk, away from that. My dad came home with a similar saw a couple years back. I can actually grab the blade and wiggle the arbor side to side by a visible amount. Generally speaking one would like for the blade to stay in one spot. The fence also doesn't lock securely enough without putting a C clamp on the back end.
With a contractor size saw you get a much larger table. This makes a world of difference. Especially since the lesser equipped your shop is the more likely you are to ask the table saw to do all sorts of things you didn't really intend at the outset.
It's more than double the cost of what you're looking at, but take a serious look at the Ridgid TS3650 at HD.
-Leuf
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

About three years ago, I sold my Unisaw -- along with a number of other stationary power gear -- 'cause I just didn't have the time to spend doing the woodworking that I had been doing. Recently, after much evaluation, I picked up the Rigid TS2400. I am happy I did.
While no portable bench style saw can come close to my old Unisaw, the Rigid sure does a fine job. Out of the box, it needed very little tuning (I am a stickler for a well tuned table saw). I did have to do a bit of of an adjustment to the fence, which was no big deal. But the blade alignment to the table was dead on, as well as the blade to the miter slots. I recently dadoed some pressured treated 4x4s for a pergola I built, and the motor handled the task without any hint of power reduction.
The Rigid also comes with an easy to set-up/take-down wheeled cart for mounting the saw on. The cart is wonderful.
Here's one review: http://www.asktooltalk.com/home/reviews/stationary/ridgid-table-saw.htm
--
Dave
www.davebbq.com
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If you're just starting out and need something a step above a circular saw then you'll probably be happy with the Craftsman bench top table saw for a while. If you're thinking about doing precision woodworking then you most likely would want to look for something with more flexibility, adjustability, and stability than this type of saw. I started out with a Dewalt bench top saw, model 744. It was fine for two or three years. It had a 24" rip capacity and would handle a full stack of dado blades. What finally convinced me to move up was the limited surface area of the top of the saw. It took a lot of effort to manuever sheet goods and longer stock through the blade. I ended up going with a Ridgid contractors saw which has a cast iron top, mobile base and received good reviews. My only minor complaint is that the dust collection port is shop vac diameter and not 4" dust collector size. Otherwise I've been very happy with it. Another reason I bought the Ridgid was that I got it for a great price. I was leaning toward a Grizzly contractors saw but the Ridgid ended up coming in a couple hundred dollars cheaper. I took advantage of a special promotion they had for signing up for a commercial account. I would do some research in the archives of this newsgroup, read some woodworking magazine reviews and possibly talk to some fellow woodworkers about their preferences. Eventually if I ever move up to a larger workshop I would like to get a cabinet saw with an extension table and 3+ HP. Good luck and have fun.
Dale
snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?catΎnch+Power+Tools&pid921805000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Table+Saws&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote: > I am going to buy a table saw and was looking for some recommendations. > I am using it for various household woodworking projects, but nothing > too fancy - I don't think it would be worth it to spend a whole lot on > it considering how much use I think it will get. > > One I have my eye on at the moment is this Craftsman one:
A few things to consider:
IF you buy a DECENT table saw with a GOOD fence, you will be able to make accurate as well as repetitive cuts.
IF you buy a DECENT table saw with a GOOD fence, you will be able to sell it when you are finished with it.
IF you buy the Craftsman or something similar, you won't be able to do either of the above, especially make accurate cuts.
I'd save my money and get a decent contractor's saw complete with a Unifence, if it were me.
Lew
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On 21 Aug 2006 18:46:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I have a Delta Contractors saw in great shape that I am looking to get rid of since I moved up to a Unisaw.
Where do you live?
Gary
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote in

*snip*
If you can take a look at it in the stores, take a look at the way the splitter aligns behind the blade. Pay attention to the distance from the mounting point to the blade. That level craftsman saw mounts the blade guard/splitter assembly off the table, giving the potential for lots of flex and binding in an essential safety tool.
Next, take a look at the blade head on. Does the splitter line up exactly with the blade or off to the side? That level Craftsman saw had (and probably still has) a problem where the splitter does not line up with the blade and pinches the board making the cut. When you start pinching, you risk kickback which, as stories here will attest, you don't want.
I have the low level Craftsman saw, and have resorted to using it without blade guard assembly to allow me to make cuts without as much concern over binding.
If you get a good saw, you'll probably be more likely to use it. If you get a bad one, you'll probably be less likely to use it, wasting the money you spent.
Puckdropper
--
Wise is the man who attempts to answer his question before asking it.

To email me directly, send a message to puckdropper (at) fastmail.fm
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?catΎnch+Power+Tools&pid921805000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Table+Saws&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
I had one very similar for 13 months (got my money back from sears) and it worked OK but you could get something like this for about the same price: http://richmond.craigslist.org/tls/192386578.html
You are better off with a larger saw if you have the room.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?catΎnch+Power+Tools&pid921805000&vertical=TOOL&subcat=Table+Saws&BV_UseBVCookie=Yes
I'd ask a knowledgeable friend to accompany you to check it over first, with the understanding that corporations don't give anything away. Extra-low price generally indicates cuts elsewhere.
Contractor saws have compromises of their own, especially typically in the trunnion braces, making tilt-angle a guess. (See Ian Kirby's "Accurate Table Saw" for details.)
Your purposes might best be met by one of the "serious" benchtop saws, like the Ridgid, DeWalt, Makita, etc. Changes for the better are taking place.
HTH, J
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On 21 Aug 2006 18:46:11 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

You would be better off getting a quality circular saw for the same money.
A quality cabinet table saw will have a precision fence, good dust collection, cast iron large flat table, smooth controls, low vibration, quality blade, and probably run on 220v.
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So from what I am reading it sounds like I can't get anything worthwhile without spending around $500. Is that true? Can I get anything decent for around $200 or $250?
Space is at a premium for me - my shop (garage) is rather small, so that is a factor in my decision.
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Yes
Can I get

No, unless it is used.

Wheels
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