table saw broken

I just came in from the workshop in an unhappy state of mind. My good old Craftsman table saw, which I've had for 20 years seems to have developed a serious problem. The height adjustment wheel spins freely for several turns and then grabs, but it only allows the blade to move upwards. I looked under the table with a light and it appears the worm shaft (if that's the right term) is slipping back and forth in its bearing sleeve, so that when screwed up tight one way, you can see almost an inch of bearing sticking out of the sleeve, and when cranked the other way the bearing emerges on the other end. This just happened; so I haven't monkeyed with it at all, but can someone tell me if this is a big problem? I have to leave town for a couple of days in the morning, and I'll be worrying about this the whole time.
Thanks for any advice, encouragement, etc.
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as long as the gears are ok the saw is probably fixable. on mine the shaft is stopped with collars held with setscrews. if the setscrew gets loose it wil do something like you are describing.
go take your trip and don't fret. when you get back, take a few hours and strip the saw all of the way down. it'll be a good opportunity to get to know the machine better, and while you're at it replace the bearings and lube all of the working parts.
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On Sun, 25 Jul 2004 23:14:57 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thanks.com wrote:
My craftsman is held in place with some snap ringson the shaft. I bought some new ones at a bearing shop when I tore my saw down (I think they were 20 cents a piece). I don't think this is major probem either just a good time like bridger suggests to get to know your saw better.

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I have a 9" Craftsman TS that my father purchased in 1953. I had the identical problem and found the exact same fix as OPUS. Cost me less than a dollar. Suggestion you can go to Sears.com and with the model number find the IPC and you will get a visual of the partes and the assembly.
Ken

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<<I just came in from the workshop in an unhappy state of mind. My good old Craftsman table saw, which I've had for 20 years seems to have developed a serious problem. The height adjustment wheel spins freely for several turns and then grabs, but it only allows the blade to move upwards. I looked under the table with a light and it appears the worm shaft (if that's the right term) is slipping back and forth in its bearing sleeve, so that when screwed up tight one way, you can see almost an inch of bearing sticking out of the sleeve, and when cranked the other way the bearing emerges on the other end. >>
By coincidence, I just developed a similar problem on my saw this week, only mine is a PowrKraft (Montgomery Ward) and I have torn my house apart looking for the manual and can't find it. Fortunately, I live in CT and what few remnants of the original manufacturer still exist are at the Tool Kraft company only about a half hour from here. When I went there last week looking for a replacement manual, George (apparently the only guy in the place who knows anything about PowrKraft tools) was on vacation. I'm going back this week and maybe George can even fix it for me.
Lee
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To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"



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You lost a roll pin...

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I owned one of the old Craftsman saws for nearly 30 years and I wouldn't worry myself out of a good trip.
As I recall the worm gear rides in a sleeve that has one or two setscrews. Chances are, the setscrew(s) backed out or are worn. If damaged these would be hardware store items. Secondly, on the few occasions I had to buy parts for the saw I was surprised at how reasonable they were. If the setscrews are not the problem take a look at your handbook and illustrated parts book (book is probably available on line at Sears website, under customer service). It is probably fixable.

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Sounds like you lost a thrust bearing or other surface meant to keep the shaft from moving in & out (rather than the "around) it's expected to move in.

Inspect the shaft, & try to find out what used to keep it from moving in the along-the-shaft direction. I won't speculate what Sears might have used, but some folks here might know specifically. It's most likely not a big deal at all, could be as simple as a slipped circlip or a worn-away rollpin. I doubt anything is broken-broken, just that a wear-able part has been wearing, and has now completed it's wearing process.
Let us know what you find, please!
Dave Hinz
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Dave, you and a number of other posters were right. It was as you predicted, a slipped circlip. I expect it slipped because the thrust was too much for it to handle, due to sawdust buildup on the mechanism. Anyway, I put it back, brushed everything clean, and greased up all the various bearing surfaces, and I'm back in business a few minutes after I got home.
Thanks everyone-- I really appreciate the help and encouragement.
On Mon, 26 Jul 2004 18:38:07 +0000, Dave Hinz wrote:

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Yay! Hope the stress didn't wreck your vacation.

That makes sense, yup. Good reminder that I should go in & de-cake the sawdust in the TS as well.
Thanks for the followup (helps the next guy as well) Dave Hinz
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ranted:

Check for loose/missing setscrews on the knob to fasten it to the shaft. Or, like the others said, you lost a roll pin or snap ring. Chances are good that it's a simple fix.
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