Table Saw Blade won't Tighten

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Actually it does. Left blade saws use a reverse thread nut or bolt. Right blade saws use a regular threaded retainer. With both you tighten the bolt in the opposite direction that the blade spins.
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It will be reverse thread if it is a right tilt or if the nut is on the left side of the blade, in the case of a circular saw.
All arbot nuts tighten in the reverse dirrection that the blade spins. If the nut is on the right, the nut tightens clockwise. If the nut is on the left it tightens counter clockwise.
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Leon wrote:

Right. I was thinking only of my saw. A better way of putting it to the OP is "Well, so you can't tighten it. So what? Just snug it up and the running of the saw will secure the nut... Probably. Wouldn't hurt to stand clear the first time, though."
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For some reason I have lost the OP's opening comment however IIRC he had a problem of getting the nut tight enough that the blade would not free spin. That can easily happen of the threads have debris in them. My current saw has 2 wrenches and after using magnetic shims on a dado set I have witnessed the arbor nut giving enough resistance that 2 wrenches were required to snug up the nut. I noticed that the shim hole was no longer "round" and found a piece of it in the threads of the arbor. Being magnetic it did not fall out. I have learned to stick the shim on to the blade prior to mounting on the arbor vs. sliding the shim on the arbor by itself.
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That's the way *all* circular saws are made.
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wrote:

The only difficulty is on a saw with soft start and a brake. Braking torque is applied to the motor shaft. The blade's inertia works to loosen the nut. It was an issue for me only once and with a new saw. The arbor nut was apparently not fully torqued. After a few test cuts, I was left to wonder why the brake had suddenly "failed". I can see that becoming an issue in a very noisy shop. You might not hear the blade whirring as it slowly winds down on its own.
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This is a reply to all of you that responded to my original and subsequent post. I appreciate all comments, especially those discussing safety.
Now just a little background. I have been using this saw for many years (since 2001 I think) and after I moved to Vermont I started setting up my new shop. I had been using the table saw to build some benches for the wife' art studio. This included using a standard thin kerf and dado blades with no problems. There is no way to keep the from arbor rotating when tightening the arbor nut. (To tighten the arbor nut I must lock the blade with a piece of wood (per saw user guide) to keep it from rotating.)
I then started work on a workbench for the shop, used the standard blade, then changed to the dado blade (all OK so far) then changed back to the standard blade and the arbor nut would not tighten up! First thought I was having a senior moment and forgot how to mount the blade!!!! :-).
It kept slipping such that the entire arbor would rotate as I turned the nut. Now, to attach the blade, you put the blade on to the arbor, then add the blade collar, then the nut. The blade collar is "dome" shaped with the "inside" of the dome facing the blade. When the nut is tightened the blade collar compresses against the blade and holds the blade fast against the arbor.
After I cleaned the nut, collar and blade, the nut tightened up just fine. I have using the saw regularly since my post on 9 March with no problems.
I certainly scratched my head over this, as did my brother who is also a woodworker. Read, reread and rereread the user guide and then posted my original message.
I looked at the parts but did not see anything obvious that would cause the blade to slip. I thought the blade collar had maybe "lost" its compression strength and was going to buy a new one from Ridgid. Then I decided to just use a bit of sand paper to clean the surfaces (nothing to lose if it did not work).... and lo and behold the blade tightened up just fine. Carefully stood back and started the saw with no flying objects seen :-). Shut down the saw and checked blade tightness and all was good. Made some cuts and everything AOK!. I have been using the saw for a few weeks (changed blades several times) and still OK. Again, thanks to all who posted comments.
Marty
Marty wrote:

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