structural integrity for water tower

I am building a small water tower and want to make sure that it doesn't collapse. It needs to be 8-10 feet tall and be able to support about 2,500 pounds (300 gallons).
I was thinking of using 4 4x4s anchored braced into cement pilings, 2x6s & carriage bolts for lateral supports, and metal braces for diagonal supports.
Will this be enough?
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Do you have earthquakes/tornados/hurricanes etc. where you live? The answer will make a huge difference. -Jack

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What is the shape of the water storage tank (HxW)? Also, build in as many triangles as you can through X bracing.
ELA

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Craig,
Please contact a local licensed structural engineer. 2500 pounds is a lot of weight to have 10 feet in the air. At the very least, improperly braced members could buckle and cause a collapse (on someone). Other problems are amplified considerably if you are in an area subject to earthquakes, high winds, tornadoes, hurricanes etc...
Craig D wrote:

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leonard lopez wrote:

Craig, Locating a water tank about the same size somewhere in your area and (shudder) copying the construction may a way to go. Better than asking how to build or support one (with the information you provided) and then building it using the two paragraphs of information you receive that may relate to construction techniques. I think you probably have been warned enough that it will be heavy and must withstand all that nature can throw at it. I hate to bring up nuclear threat, but that may be something to consider and the terrorist threat .... :>) Regards, Hank
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Hi Craig, hi folks.
Dont forget to consider the weigth of the tank.
300 US gal weight around 2500 pounds. A container for that much water can weight a non negligible weight. Plus, some of the upper structure will also add some weight that shall be held by the legs and anchors.
Jack also pointed out an important item, earthquake. An earthquake can impart horizontal forces that may damage or even destroy a structure that otherwise is solid enough to hold vertical forces.
Also, consider the weight of snow and/or ice if this is applicable for your place. Maybe you will need some heating system to avoid freezing in very cold climate.
Maybe a look at:
http://www.motherearthnews.com/menarch/archive/issues/039/039-044-01.htm
will also help.
This is only one of many sites returned by Google using "water tower design" as the search string.
Jean (Johnny) Lemire from Richelieu, Quebec, Canada
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Jean,
Now _this_ is a truly complete answer to Craig's question. Only things missing is (a) what to serve the crew for breakfast and (2) how much beer to cool down for the _post_ construction wing-ding!
I'll be adding Mother Earth News to my Favorites list.
DexAZ

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Cool idea, I have something similar here on a smaller scale. It is only 5' high but enough where water will flow. Wind was a consideration since the calimity that might require it's use would be a hurricane. The tank was already part of my water system. It is a 150 gallon fiberglass "aireator" that are on virtually every well system in SW Florida. The tare weight of the tank is less than 50 lbs with the internal fittings, valve and spray heads 2 of these on a platform would get you up to the 300 gallons without the weight and rust problems of steel. They may even make them in 300 gallons.
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Thank you for all of your responses...
The tank is cylinder with a 46" diameter and weighs only about 70 lbs. The tower will be placed in an area that doesn't get snow, has extremely little earthquake risk, and is on very solid ground (and old river bed that is solid rock). Per the comment on foundation, each column will rest on a footing sunk 2 feet in the ground (or as far down as I can get it before hitting solid rock).
The article that was mentioned suggests using telephone poles... could 4x4s handle the load?
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The real problem with 4x4s would be finding them treated to the level that you get with a phone pole (typically 2.5cca around here) You can also get these poles in 6" (for dock builders) and that would be plenty. The borgs handle .80cca 6x6s.
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Also note that PT is more elastic than non-PT.
Me 4x6 minimum, and my "X" with no more than 36" gap on the legs.

you
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When you get to th rock consider drilling a few holes in it to anchor the footings, with steel, to the rock. Joe belt and suspenders as necessary
Craig D wrote:

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Hi Craig, hi folks.
The construction you suggest in your first post shall be quite solid. Just make sure that you dig deep enough for your leg's anchors so they are below the frost line if applicable to your place.
Also, make sure your diagonal metal braces will not rust.
Otherwise I would say: go for it and observe it closely to see if it holds well as it ages. Then, correct any weakness as required.
Just ideas.
Jean (Johnny) Lemire from Richelieu, Quebec, Canada.
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snipped-for-privacy@donatofamily.com (Craig D) wrote in message

Sure, if you use enough of them. If you use four, the normal compressive stress in the wood will be a bit over 60 psi. That's not much but your real concern is not crushing of the wood but buckling. That's a tougher problem to analyze and I concur with the others than consultation with someone who knows what they are doing is a real good idea.
Don't forget wind loading.
--

FF

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Geez, Clint, what took you so long? :-)
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Been in a tolerent mood, I guess.
wrote in message

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